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Have You Been Diagnosed By A Mental Health Professional?


Guest Zenda

Your Diagnosis  

83 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you see a Gender Therapist

    • diagnosed by self
      40
    • diagnosed by a gender therapist
      52
    • have not seen a gender therapist
      5
    • have seen a gender therapist
      20
    • will see a gender therapist
      15
    • Are seeing a gender therapist
      36
    • will not see a gender therapist
      1
  2. 2. Which is your gender therapist

    • Psychiatrist
      23
    • Psychologist
      60


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Guest Zenda

Kia Ora,

I have chosen multiple choice question-So you can tick more than one box...

Now I’m well aware that there are quite a number of trans-people who don’t feel the need to be diagnosed by a mental health professional, many have 'self' diagnosed themselves - in some cases by reading info from the internet…

However just out of curiosity how many members have been ‘professionally’ diagnosed ? and how many have diagnosed ‘themselves’ ? Also how many of you will see/are seeing/or have seen a gender therapist?

Metta Jendar :)

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Hi Jendar,

Good topic, I'll be interested in seeing how many people prefer to self diagnose.

I was never that sure of myself so I wanted a confirmation and got it instantly!

I enjoy my sessions, my therapist is very supportive and we can all use a little more support can't we?

Love ya,

Sally

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I kinda goofed i should have clicked diagnosed by self, diagnosed by a gender therapist and are seeing a gender therapist.

I have known all my life who i am but to hear my therapist say that i am transsexual at the end of my first session was a relief.

I have had weekly sessions for the last 3-1/2 months and recently switched to every two weeks. My therapist is like a good friend and i look forward to my sessions.

Paula.

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Guest Elizabeth K

I really avoid calling it 'diagnosed." My therapist suggested I was 'probably transsexual." She called it a 'condition." We together agreed that is what condition I had after she told me of all the markers, all which I had.

Lizzy

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Guest Leigh

i guess i've know for a couple years...maybe about 3? but i never went to a gender therapist. i had a general therapist for a while, and i wanted to tell her but i could never get up the nerve (lol..just my therapist and i can't tell her.. i wonder how i'll ever tell my family..). i'm hoping to go back to her soon and tell her that i'm a man... and then maybe she can help me find somewhere in cali that will have cervices for trans kids (i'm planing to move next year).

but for now, not diagnosed, not on T.

love&peace

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Guest Zenda

Kia Ora,

Just thought I’d clarify things a little…The link below explains the difference between the mental health professionals…

In brief a psychiatrist can diagnoses and prescribe [they are also medical doctors] A psychologist can diagnose but can’t prescribe ‘medication’…

Both a psychiatrist and psychologist can be psychotherapists, but a psychotherapist doesn’t have to be either…A psychotherapist can ‘just’ be a psychotherapist…

These definitions are based on what qualifies in the UK, and most other commonwealth countries- they may vary in other non commonwealth countries…

http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/details/Default.aspx?Id=290

My condition was ‘diagnosed’ by a psychiatrist,[my endo wouldn’t prescribe an anti-testosterone till I had been diagnosed professionally]…I had counselling with a psychotherapist…

However before I was found ‘suitable’ for surgery[remember I had government funded surgery] I was assessed by the gender clinic’s psychiatrist and their clinical psychologist who was also a social worker…A lot of red tape I know, but they were just doing their job, it didn’t bother me- after all, they were only confirming [with legal documentation] what I already knew…

Metta Jendar :)

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Guest julia_d

How about a consultant psycho-sexologist? where do they fit in the scheme of things? Mine can tell my gp what to prescribe.. and can probably prescribe himself but hasn't so far.

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Guest Zenda
How about a consultant psycho-sexologist? where do they fit in the scheme of things? Mine can tell my gp what to prescribe.. and can probably prescribe himself but hasn't so far.

Kia Ora Julia,

Isn't a consultant psycho- sexologist, a 'sort of' gender/sex psychologist/psychiatrist anyway? Plus if he/she is recognised by the UK's Gender Recognition Panel as being able to diagnose the condition -I guess he/she's still a mental health professional in the eyes of those who hold the power...

Metta Jendar :)

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Guest Little Sara

Diagnosed by self and diagnosed by a psychiatrist who is NOT a gender therapist. Have not and will not see a gender therapist. I had to choose 'psychiatrist' in the second choice because I couldn't leave it blank - my therapist was not a gender therapist.

I see no reason to go see one whatsoever.

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  • 3 years later...
Guest KerryUK

I had to vote in a few of the boxes.

Self Diagnosed - yes, I've known and suppressed it for years (it just won't go away :) ).

Diagnosed by a Gender Therapist - well not quite, had a Mental Health assessment by the local Mental Health Psychiatrist. He diagnosed Gender Identity Disorder and recommended my referral to a Gender Identity Clinic.

Will see a Gender Therapist - waiting for my first appointment with the Gender Identity Clinic on the NHS. At the moment the waiting list is around 10 months :( .

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Guest Haidos

Self and professionally diagnosed.

Of course i knew already but needed their input to begin physically transitioning.

Mine was a psychologist but i'm pretty sure i've had a second opinion with pychiatrist before beginning hormones.

And they told my doctor what to prescibe, didn't do it themselves.

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I read up and then diagnosed myself. My sole purpose in seeing a psychologist (and subsequently two) was first to get approval for hormone therapy and then for surgery. My official diagnosis was gender dysphoria, but my primary letter for surgery specified that my surgery was medically necessary and that I had no mental disorder. I appreciated that.

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The poll is quite old and the 7th version of the SoC (as well as APA's terminology update) quite alter the meaning of the questions: now, the only thing that should be "diagnosed" is gender dysphoria (quoting the SoC: "Being Transsexual, Transgender, or Gender Nonconforming Is a Matter of Diversity, Not Pathology").

About GD, I can say I'm self-diagnosed; but my new therapist has pretty much acknowledged it (and in our very first meeting). After all, nobody can know better than me how much "discomfort or distress that is caused by a discrepancy between a person’s gender identity and that person’s sex assigned at birth" I feel (and yes, I just quoted the SoC again :P ).

About being transsexual, I should admit that the only diagnosis I have is my own; although that's why when I talk about it I say something like "I'm probably transsexual"; rather than asserting it as an established fact.

BTW, neither my old therapist nor the new one are specialists in gender issues, although the new one seems to be quite documented about the topic. And they are both psychologists. AFAIK, under Spanish laws, any licensed psychologist can refer an individual for HRT / SRS (although, of course, the endo or surgeon will have the final say on whether the patient meets the medical requirements to undergo a specific treatment).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Kia Ora,

Just thought I'd clarify things a little…The link below explains the difference between the mental health professionals…

In brief a psychiatrist can diagnoses and prescribe [they are also medical doctors] A psychologist can diagnose but can't prescribe 'medication'…

Both a psychiatrist and psychologist can be psychotherapists, but a psychotherapist doesn't have to be either…A psychotherapist can 'just' be a psychotherapist…

These definitions are based on what qualifies in the UK, and most other commonwealth countries- they may vary in other non commonwealth countries…

http://www.nhscareer...ult.aspx?Id=290

My condition was 'diagnosed' by a psychiatrist,[my endo wouldn't prescribe an anti-testosterone till I had been diagnosed professionally]…I had counselling with a psychotherapist…

However before I was found 'suitable' for surgery[remember I had government funded surgery] I was assessed by the gender clinic's psychiatrist and their clinical psychologist who was also a social worker…A lot of red tape I know, but they were just doing their job, it didn't bother me- after all, they were only confirming [with legal documentation] what I already knew…

Metta Jendar smile.gif

Just wanted to add something in clarifying the difference in psychiatrist and psychologist:

Psychiatrists are trained medical doctors who are taught to approach things from a medical stand point. They typically see a list of symptoms match it with the closest diagnoses and dish out the proscribed treatment.

Psychologists are trained to be scientists and practitioners, they approach things with the goal of understanding the whole problem and finding solutions to those parts which are not beneficial to the individual. Some psychologists have prescription rights, but most psychologists tend to lean toward behavioral interventions.

Often these two professionals attend the same post-education conferences and continuing education programs so there is allot of crossover in approaches.

Psychotherapy is a behavioral intervention and comes in many forms. There are also many other behavioral interventions such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Holistic Therapy, Humanistic Therapy, etc... Anyone can claim to be a practitioner in any of these types of therapies, but if they are charging for their services they are probably regulated by some form of professional or political organization.

There is no enforced standard or licensure for Gender Therapists in the U.S.; a gender therapist is just a practitioner who claims to be competent in gender specific issues. This could be a psychiatrist, psychologist, or even a social worker.

-Evalyn

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i dont know, i probably screwed up the results because i just clicked anything that was appllicable, and that was more than one answer for each question.

i knew what i was, but wasnt sure of the right word for it. i didnt grow up knowing anything about trans anything in existance or sex changes or gay people or anything like that. so all i knew is what i am, or rather what i am and am not, and how i feel.

i dont know why any trans people would be too chicken to go to a therapist, are they afraid the shrink will say theyre not transsexual after all or what?

if someone doesnt have a clue what they are what they want or how they feel i dont know how they expect anyone else to know them any better than they do.

psychistrists are Medicia Doctors as well as trained in psychology stuff. so they can write prescriptions as any doctor can.

anyone else (social workers, psychologists etc) can recommend or refer to a doctor who is capable of prescribing whatever it is.... meds/hormones. the MD, (doctor) or Endo, or whatever, they can consider the recomendation/referral of the therapists but they are not under any obligation to do anything.

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  • 7 months later...
Guest sophia.gentry58

I was diagnosed by my GT and was quite surprised to hear that I am transsexual. I always knew that I had some serious issues with respect to my gender identity, but I never equated them to transsexuality, however it may so much sense once I came to understand and accept the diagnosis.

With respect to the credentials of mental health providers, the only peolple who can diagnose any mental health issue are those who, one, have the necessary degrees and two, have been licensed from the state in which they intend to practice. This of course would include the psychiatrist and psychologist, but also psyhotherapists, License Professional Counselors (LPC), Marriage and Family Therapist, Social workers who have been licensed as a clinician (not all social workers are clinician and therefore cannot diagnose anything) etc.

I marked psychologist because all clinical mental health providers are on the same level as most psychologists. My GT is an LPC, however, Evalyn has stated that "There is no enforced standard or licensure for Gender Therapists in the U.S., this is not entirely true." To say that "a gender therapist is just a practitioner who claims to be competent in gender specific issues" is a bit oversimplistic. For any therapist to claim any expertise in any specialty such as GD must meet acceptable standards set by the state in which they practice. If any therapist claims to practice a specialty without adhering to the strict standards of the state that they are praticiing in, they could be at the very least, sanctioned, suspended, or fined; at the other end of the spectrum they could lose their license, prosecuted, and sent to jail.

Sophia

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Guest Melissa~

To expand on my vote I placed on this poll months ago. I self diagnosed fifteen years ago, I just wasn't sure what to do about it for a long time. I have a couple psychologists that have concurred (and none that don't) that I have GID and made that a primary diagnosis. One doctor is a regional leader, literally, as president of the regional psychological association, her focus patients are those with sexual issues, as far as TS/TG she has extensive experience in that. That's mighty useful in a state where hospitals have problems with visitors they don't like.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest Kontessa

I checked off several boxes because:

1. I new at a very young age something was wrong and I self diagnosed myself.

2. I was diagnosed by a gender therapist as having GD after my first session (she has helped over 300 to transition, impressive).

3. I am currently seeing her - my gender therapist.

4. She is also a doctor and can give me preps. (she had recommended a good M. D. who is doing my blood work)

I have had several other therapists in the past who were not gender specialists and as a result I was wasting time and money on them. GD is too big to handle on your own and it is important - and well worth the money - to find a gender therapist - one who is familar with our needs.

Many hugs and best wishes to all!

Kontessa

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Guest N. Jane

Hummmm ..... how about "none of the above"?

I was diagnosed by Dr. Harry Benjamin in 1966 in New York at the age of 16 (ME, not him! LOL!). I KNEW I was TS from the first time I heard the word but I hoped a formal diagnosis from an expert would help in finding treatment.

I had a "psychiatric evaluation" by a team of psychiatrists about 1968 who pronounced me "sane and relatively well-balanced, under the circumstances" (ROFL!) but no therapy. Of course this was before any "standard of care".

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  • 8 years later...

Here in the U.S., do we really have to have an evaluation to include a letter and in order for me/my guardian to give our informed consent?

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  • Forum Moderator

What @Jandi said. Some states require more than others. I'm not sure about Virginia, because I don't live there. Here in Michigan, I needed to talk to a therapist with a specialty in gender issues for an hour and get a letter from here before I could proceed with HRT. I had to get two more letters before I could proceed with GCS.

 

Some states though? You can sign an informed consent form to dissolve liability and get HRT at least. I don't think you can do informed consent for surgery though. At least not in the states.

 

Hugs!

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In NC it's "Informed consent" for HRT.  You just sign some paperwork.   I'm not sure about GRS, having not gotten that far.  Might be up to the surgeon (or insurance people if any)  You do need some kind of letter for gender change on DL.

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On 4/3/2009 at 2:47 PM, Guest Zenda said:

Kia Ora,

I have chosen multiple choice question-So you can tick more than one box...

Now I’m well aware that there are quite a number of trans-people who don’t feel the need to be diagnosed by a mental health professional, many have 'self' diagnosed themselves - in some cases by reading info from the internet…

However just out of curiosity how many members have been ‘professionally’ diagnosed ? and how many have diagnosed ‘themselves’ ? Also how many of you will see/are seeing/or have seen a gender therapist?

Metta Jendar :)


I am currently seeing a gender therapist, but I don't think they're quite a psychiatrist or a psychologist; they're an LCSW; Licensed Clinical Social Worker; not necessarily a psychologist in the professional since, but perhaps a psychologist in the educational sense, seeing as he's definitely not a psychiatrist, as he has ZERO authority to diagnose me with anything, or prescribe any medications.

In regards to getting diagnosed as transgender, I'm one of the ones who actively refuses to get diagnosed. To seek a diagnosis would be to think that my being transgender is something that is sick and/or wrong, and I just can't possibly believe in that. I DO have a plethora of mental illnesses, but being transgender is NOT one of them; anymore than my having brown eyes is a mental illness lol. 

And since I'm a superhero nerd, here's one of my favorite superhero quotes in all of superhero cinema lol:

"They can't cure us. You want to know why? Because there's nothin' to cure. Nothing's wrong with you. Or any of us, for that matter.” 

--Aurora Monroe/Storm, X-Men: The Last Stand (2006)

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