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Ornithine decarboxylaser. Vaniqa anybody?


Maid In Bedlam

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A long time ago I got this prescribed by my doc.

 

It did not do anything for me. Well at least did not seem to as I recall. However I did talk to someone once who claimed it did what it was suppose to.

 

Has anyone else tried it?

 

I was pre hormones at the time.  Pre everything in fact so the tube must be about 5 years old. I just found it. Before I throw it out I was inclined to share it. If nothing else as an option for some.

 

 

<link removed>

 

Vaniqa blocks an enzyme called ornithine decarboxylase, which is involved in the production of the hair shaft by the hair follicle. Vaniqa has been shown to reduce the rate of hair growth. In clinical trials, improvement of facial hair was seen in 70% of women. In addition, Vaniqa significantly reduced how bothered patients felt by their facial hair and by the time spent removing, treating, or concealing facial hair. Patient comfort in various social and work settings was also improved.

 

 

1905895754_20190506_0954511.thumb.jpg.967e964ca9e7c27fa56060e016bf4493.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by VickySGV
Link to an online Pharmacy site with dosages.
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This is a prescribed medication.  None of the doctors i know who are well versed in trans issues or are themselves trans have mentioned or recommended this product.  For that reason i doubt it is effective.  When i look at the side effects i would be worried to try it.  1 in 10 chances of some nasty conditions is terrible odds.

As lovely as it may seem laser or electrolysis is a more effective and safer path.

 

Hugs,

 

Charlize

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I had to remove the link since it did contain other information we cannot allow, but this was a product for women whose facial hair issues developed under the influence of Estrogen, and female hirsutism is a different hair issue than a male beard.  I also noted that it is no longer available on that site, which means it probably did not sell well, or had too many complaints and problems.  If you have disposal days for unused or expired medications (which I suspect this one could be) in your area, that would be a good place to take it for disposal.

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The Cream is prescribed in the UK for as part of the list of medications for gender dysphoria aswell as for women with facial hair conditions.

 

I do acknowledge that laser or electrolysis would be far more effective. However it is an option in the UK as the general rule of thumb is they give you only 20hrs of treatment before you have to pay for the treatment. My personal session costs me £67 per hour. I needed at least 100 hours which works out to £5,829 and that is just a guide to time spent. So would it not be nice if there was a cream that worked?

 

 

 

It was prescribed for me and acknowledged and endorsed by my gender therapist. Also is mentioned in NHS documents on the treatment of gender dysphoria. To quote just one Namely Document whc (2016) 040 created by The Welsh Goverment for NHS Wales.

 

Quote: Typical drugs recommended by Gender Identity Clinics include oestradiol preparations (e.g. transdermal oestradiol gels and patches, and oral oestradiol preparations), testosterone preparations (e.g. gels, and Sustanon® and Nebido® injection), gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues and depilatory agents (e.g. Vaniqa®); this list is not exhaustive. Apart from Sustanon®, there are no licensed products with an approved indication for the treatment of gender dysphoria. There is, however, extensive clinical experience of the use of these products in the treatment of gender dysphoria over decades which provides evidence of tolerability and safety comparable with their use for approved indications.

 

What I did not relise is it has been mentioned in a Thread on this site in 2010

 

Link to old thread here

 

It proved to be a little controversial and in my opnion was only part of the story. So my apologies for repeating a topic.  Seeing as that was Nine years ago I would expect a fresh look at the medication would be apt.

 

May I just reiterate this is a precribed medication in the UK

 

My original question was. Has anyone else tried it?

 

I have seen differing reports on it,s results on other trans sites It would appear to be well used if you take the results from alternative sites as a guide.

 

The removed link was just generic and was not a problem Vicky.  I am also aware of the safe disposal, of unused medications but thank you for your concerns and advise ?

 

 

 

 

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