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Fun Friday Fact - hope you respond weekly to give us all a smile


Heather Shay

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27 minutes ago, Colleen Henderson said:

You could have fooled me.  I thought it was my ex-wife.

Me, too. Although, I admit that gives the T-Rex a bad reputation...

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Ouch ladies.....

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  1. Light is made up of energy.
  2. 02Light travels in a straight line. Objects in its path cause light to bend or refract.
  3. 03The speed of light is exactly 299 792 km per second.
  4. 04This is the speed when light is travelling in a vacuum and not obstructed by the atmosphere.
  5. 05Travelling at the speed of light, you could go around Earth 7.5 times in a second.
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You are the tallest first thing in the morning.

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6 minutes ago, Colleen Henderson said:

Yet that's when you weigh the least.

Usually loose a bit of weight shortly after I get up.

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Some stuff about sleep

 

On the first night of sleeping in a new place, one hemisphere of our brain remains more active than the other during sleep. Scientists believe this "vigilant mode" allows us to respond more quickly to unfamiliar, potentially danger-signaling sounds

 

A malingerer is someone who pretends to have a sleep disorder in order to get medication or other attention

 

REM atonia, or sleep paralysis, occurs in the typical sleeper every night to prevent people from acting out their dreams. Only a few muscles have the ability to move during REM sleep, such as the eye muscles, the auditory muscles, and the diaphragm for respiration.

 

The average amount of time people sleep has dropped from nine hours in the pre-lightbulb era to seven-and-a-half hours today

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2 hours ago, Jandi said:

Usually loose a bit of weight shortly after I get up.

 

lol, I was thinking the same thing, but I couldn't come up with a polite way to word it. 😆

 

18 minutes ago, miz miranda said:

On the first night of sleeping in a new place, one hemisphere of our brain remains more active than the other during sleep. Scientists believe this "vigilant mode" allows us to respond more quickly to unfamiliar, potentially danger-signaling sounds

 

So that's why, for the life of me, I absolutely cannot manage to get a halfway decent night's sleep when I travel (and even that's after hours of trying to doze off in the first place). It's a really annoying, anxiety-fueled deterrent to traveling for me.

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There is a technical name for the "fear of long words." It's called "hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia."

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Supposedly, the term "Bucket list" was created around 1999 to 2007 for the movie with the same name. Which is weird because I always assumed it was a much older term and that that it had nothing to do with the movie as far as its origin. 

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words:

 

Startling is the only 9-letter word where you can remove one letter at a time and still create a word: Startling -> Starting -> Staring -> String -> Sting -> Sing -> Sin -> In -> I.

Deeded is the only word that is made using only two different letters, each used three times.

 

Stressed is desserts spelled backwards.

 

Feedback is the shortest word that contains the letters ABCDEF.

 

Listen contains the same letters as silent.

 

Misspelled/misspelt is – ironically – one of the most commonly misspelled words.

 

Pronunciation is one of the most often mispronounced words.

 

lastly in homage to hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia

Poecilonym is a synonym for the word synonym.

 

 

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Trying to answer the burning question did Dinosaurs head butt

 

"Finding out brings us closer to their social lives: were pachycephalosaurs more likely just showing off their domes like peacocks with their tails, or were they also cracking their heads together like musk oxen?"

Using CT scanning and a new statistical method for diagnosing behavior in fossil animals, the researchers compared the bony-headed dinosaur with modern ungulates (hoofed animals) that engage in different kinds of combat.

"Our analyses are the closest we can get to observing their behavior. In a way, we can get "inside their heads" by colliding them together virtually. We combined anatomical and engineering analyses of all these animals for a pretty thorough approach," says Snively. "We looked at the actual tissue types in the skulls and heads of the animals."

Head butting is a form of male-to-male competition for access to females, says Dr. Jessica Theodor, co-author and associate professor in the biological sciences department at the University of Calgary. "It's pretty clear that although the bones are arranged differently in the Stegoceras, it could easily withstand the kinds of forces that have been measured for the living animals that engage in head butting."

Most head-butting animals have domes like a good motorcycle helmet. "They have a stiff rind on the outside with a sort of a spongy energy absorbing material just beneath it and then a stiff, really dense coat over the brain," says Snively. The Stegoceras had an extra layer of dense bone in the middle. Stegoceras was a small pachycephalosaur about the size of a German shepherd, and lived about 72 million years ago.

Llamas would crack their skulls head butting and giraffes aren't very good at it. "They swing their necks at each other and try to hit each other in the neck or the side," says Snively. If giraffes do manage to butt heads, they can knock each other out because "Their anatomy isn't built to absorb the collision as well as something like muskox or big horn sheep."

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Here's an odd piece of high heel trivia. The first recorded instance of wearing high heels was King John of England. He wore them regularly because he was so much shorter than his older brother, RIchard the Lionhearted.

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6 minutes ago, Marcie Jensen said:

Here's an odd piece of high heel trivia. The first recorded instance of wearing high heels was King John of England. He wore them regularly because he was so much shorter than his older brother, RIchard the Lionhearted.

🐛🏳️‍⚧️🦋👠👢👠👡👢👠💖

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image.png.6877a2f3ad83feaaa1495804e198ffc7.png

Malala Yousafzai, the girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban for insisting on going to school, recently completed her final exams in the University of Oxford.

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Good for her.  Now the other women and girls left behind under Taliban rule need help! 

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1 minute ago, Jani said:

Good for her.  Now the other women and girls left behind under Taliban rule need help! 

Agreed. Having been there many times over the years, courtesy of the U.S. Army, and having been out among the populace (at one point I spoke Dari--one of the primary languages) I can say with some confidence that Afghanistan, and the Taliban, are firmly lodged in about the 13th century culturally.

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An interesting discussion on this topic can be found at https://upgrader.gapminder.org/t/sdg-world-un-goals/3/explanation

The site is a legacy of the work of Hans Rosling and provides information on how most of the world believes conditions are substantially worse than they actually are. It is worthwhile to checking out as well as his TED talks. I found it eye opening.

Around 60% of young girls in low-income countries go to school.

Source: UNESCO

 

Survey Results

Of the people we have tested, 86% got this question wrong.

  • Total

    86%

  • Japan

    94%

  • Belgium

    94%

  • Russia

    91%

  • Türkiye

    91%

  • Canada

    91%

About this misconception

Many people wrongly think a minority of girls in low-income countries go to school, probably because they know there are still huge gender inequalities in the world and they don’t want to trivialize them. Out of 195 countries, today only 27 are called low-income and only 11 of them still have big gender inequalities in primary education: Afghanistan, Guinea, South Sudan, Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Yemen, Chad, Niger, Eritrea, Mozambique and Somalia.

Forty years ago, across all low-income countries, many more boys finished primary school compared to girls but, since then, more parents across the world now prioritize their daughters’ education. Today, in most countries, both girls and boys miss school to almost the same extent, and when they do, it’s mainly because their families are extremely poor.

In most low-income countries in general, girls drop out of school more than boys when they reach puberty, partly because of bad school toilets. When countries become middle-income countries, schools are better prepared for female students. When measuring results, pretty much everywhere, girls outperform boys all the way up to higher education.

The Coronavirus pandemic resulted in more than 90% of countries globally closing schools at some point during 2020. The effect on how many girls (and boys) who might not have returned to school when they reopened is still unknown, but UNESCO projected that up to 11 million girls may not go back (particularly those aged 12-17).

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Fall Leaf Colors are Caused by Sugar

Everyone loves those colorful leaf colors in the fall from vibrant reds to eye-popping bright oranges, but did you know that the color the leaves turn is based on how much sugar is in the leaves, according to One Country.  That’s why maple leaves are such a brilliant red color.

Child playing in fall leaves.

(Ekaterina Pokrovsky / Shutterstock.com)

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  • Posts

    • Betty K
      I love that trans and gender-diverse folk have a bunch of labels for gender. To me, it shows that we’re making sense of it, really taking a close look at it, breaking it down. Of course as you explore something you have an urge to categorise it, that makes perfect sense to me. And, as you say, knowing what label applies to you helps you feel less alone. Coming from a time and place where there wasn’t even a word for trans, I can vouch for the importance of that.
    • RaineOnYourParade
      The problem is mostly on weekdays, when I have school. I wake up right before leaving for school, but I don't get hungry until a while after I wake up, so I usually skip breakfast. Eating too early in the day makes me feel sick, so I'm usually better off. I have the first lunch shift at my school (10:35-11:05, I believe), and I'm still not all that hungry, so I usually only end up eating about half of my lunch. I sometimes have a snack when I get home, but that's still 50/50 at best, and then I usually eat most of my dinner (though I sometimes only get through closer to 70%). I might eat a snack before bed sometimes, depending on the day. In addition to my morning sickness (not from pregnancy fyi lol, I've had it for a long time, it's just the best name I have for it), I get a lot of anxiety-induced nausea throughout the day basically the entire time I'm at school and my stomach doesn't settle all the way until I've gotten home usually, too.     I'm still at a healthy weight with this, and I eat better on weekend days since I can control the times I eat more, but I'm aware it's still not exactly a healthy eating schedule. It could still potentially lead to problems in the future, I'm assuming. Any tips on how to eat better for someone whose aversion(?) to food comes from a lot of nausea? 
    • Birdie
      CNA called an ambulance yesterday at my evening meds check. I was having chest pains and very short of breath.    They arrived shortly and I had an abnormal EKG and Tachycardia. I told them 'right bundle blockage' was normal for me from a previous event, and they saw nothing new.    They said it was my decision if I wanted to go to the hospital or not, but they really didn't see nothing new based off my history and the nitro was working well at relieving my discomfort. I decided to stay home and rest.    Night call nurse called me to inform me to rest and take it easy and the doctor will see me in the morning as well.    The CNA did remove my bra before the ambulance arrived saying, "just less to explain", and she of course gave them all my medical history referring to me as "he". The medic lifted my boob to attach the EKG lead and all three referred to me as "ma'am" the whole time.    After they left she said, "I was the only person in the room that thought of you as male?"   Birdie 💖
    • RaineOnYourParade
      Shadows in the corner, eyes wide
    • Carolyn Marie
      I think your view makes perfect sense, Raine.  Labels and categories can help us make sense out of something confusing, bring order to chaos, set priorities, establish groups of similar things, and many other uses.  Labels are often essential in hard science and the social sciences, too.  But they can certainly be misused and become destructive.   Carolyn Marie
    • RaineOnYourParade
      In some ways, things have been better, but they've stayed the same in other ways. I haven't had any big changes at home or been allowed to really start transitioning much, and my anxiety kind of impedes my ability to correct strangers and such. In some ways, I feel like my anxiety surrounding my gender got a bit worse following coming out to my parents.   However, it does change things with my friends, and it allows me to feel more comfortable and safe with them, like I could take off a heavy mask. For that, I'm very grateful, since that's one less place I have to be afraidi.
    • RaineOnYourParade
      I know a lot of people don't like labels, and they can be harmful, but I don't think they're all bad personally   If there's a name for something, you know you're not the only one experiencing it, and that can make things a little less scary   If I didn't ever hear the label "transgender man", I'd still be wondering why I felt the way I did, and what was wrong with me   If I didn't know labels like "pansexual", I would still be beating myself up for having feelings for people of all different genders   So, while this doesn't apply to everyone, labels did help me some -- the problem isn't labels in themselves, but rather when labels are used against people or as a stereotype    ...does this count as a hot take?  💀
    • RaineOnYourParade
      The metaphor definitely applies, but I doubt it was intentional (mostly due to the time of release).
    • Carolyn Marie
      There were 3.5 million public school teachers in the U.S. in 2021-22.  If you accept the estimate that trans folk make up around 1.5% of the population, that results in over 52,000 trans teachers.  That's quite a lot, actually.  I personally know four, including two college professors.    Carolyn Marie
    • Carolyn Marie
      Given that the story was published in book form in 1883 by C. Collodi, I think it's safe to say that the puppet and it's story has no relation to transgender issues, unless it can be shown that the author was transgender themself.   Carolyn Marie
    • Davie
    • awkward-yet-sweet
      Not me, but I know my husband has a slight curve due to bad discs and pain.  Perhaps its something related to your time in the military?  I know that soldiers tend to carry WAY too much backpack weight, and that can cause back and knee issues even for the young. 
    • awkward-yet-sweet
      I hid my attraction to girls for years.  And even though the process of my parents finding out was painful, it was a relief to get it over with.  I didn't hide my gender issues like that, but I didn't have to.  When I thought I was genderfluid, my partners knew.  Once I figured out that I probably should have been born a boy, I talked about it pretty soon after.  I anticipated rejection from my husband, and was relieved to find deeper love instead.  Overall, it has worked for me.
    • awkward-yet-sweet
      I'm kind of surprised there are any.  I mean, trans folks are a tiny minority of the population, and teachers aren't a huge part of the population.  So...a minority of a minority, its not like they would be very common.    As for "ending" them, pretty sure that's not legal.  Discrimination in hiring for government jobs was phased out a long time ago.  There's a big difference between private schools and public schools. 
    • awkward-yet-sweet
      I agree.  While I feel like I should have had a male body, I definitely don't fit into stereotypically "masculine" roles in society or family.  I'm fine with being my own odd mix of stuff.
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