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Fun Friday Fact - hope you respond weekly to give us all a smile


Heather Shay

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Well, maybe I'll add something to the day's theme of the Dewey decimal system.

 

Apparently, the system has been repeatedly revised for bias.  For example, the original version placed books related to homosexuality in the categories of "mental derangement" and "abnormal psychology.".  Today they have been more appropriately placed in the 300's area for sex and relationships. 

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"Bruce Wayne probably helps more people by being a billionaire philanthropist than he does by being Batman."

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@Heather ShayBruce probably stopped when the tax deductions were reduced

 

Does Superman cause cancer with his X-ray vision?

 

 Aqua man identifies as a mermaid

 

Wonder woman is repatative

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24 minutes ago, miz miranda said:

@Heather ShayBruce probably stopped when the tax deductions were reduced

 

Does Superman cause cancer with his X-ray vision?

 

 Aqua man identifies as a mermaid

 

Wonder woman is repatative

 

The Invisible Man is retired and living here in Central Florida. He was recently arrested for Failure To Appear. He made up some story, but the judge saw right through it. Now he's sitting in jail...they think.

 

 

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Music Affects Your Perception of the World

 

a globe and a map Shutterstock

A 2011 study conducted at the University of Groningen showed that music not only affects mood, but it has an even more significant effect on perception. Subjects who were tested were influenced by the music they heard, based on what they saw; participants were asked to listen to music and identify corresponding smiley faces. Smiley faces that matched the music were identified much more accurately. And even when no smiley face was shown, the subjects thought they recognized a happy face when listening to happy music, and a sad face when listening to sad music.

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Musical Education Leads to Better Exam Scores. Studying music is an actual workout for your brain. Learning an instrument has been proven to help students in myriad ways from mastery of memorization, pattern recognition and emotional development. Students who have experience with music performance or taking music appreciation courses score higher on the SAT(Scholastic Aptitude Test). A report indicated that they score, on average, 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on math.

 

Music Helps Plants Grow Faster. According to a study by scientists from South Korea, plants grow at a faster pace when they are played classical music. Using 14 different pieces of music, the scientists played music to a rice field and studied the results.  Findings were that the music helped the crops grow and even suggested evidence that plants could “hear”.  We suggest practicing your instrument in your veggie garden!

 

While listening to a song, you get some chills, which is mostly caused by the brain releasing dopamine as you anticipate the peak of that song.

 

Monaco’s Military Orchestra has more soldiers than its Army. The Monaco’s Army has 82 soldiers while its Orchestra has 85 soldiers. 

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2 minutes ago, miz miranda said:

Monaco’s Military Orchestra has more soldiers than its Army. The Monaco’s Army has 82 soldiers while its Orchestra has 85 soldiers. 

On Veterans; Day, it's interesting to know that Monaco has an army. 

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1 hour ago, Marcie Jensen said:

On Veterans; Day, it's interesting to know that Monaco has an army. 

 

Interesting.  My county's defense force is way larger than Monaco's army.  We should be a micro nation. 😁 

 

 

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The first novel in the world was written in c. 1000 CE by Murasaki Shikibu, a Japanese woman.

Murasaki Shikibu
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Written in the early 11th century, The Tale of Genji is now a classic of Japanese literature. Author Murasaki Shikibu was a noblewoman and lady-in-waiting, who became a cultural innovator for her great work. The original manuscript was made in the orihon style of pasting several sheets of paper together and folding them in alternating directions. In the early 20th century, the book was first translated into modern Japanese, and has since been translated into dozens of languages. The book follows the life of Hikaru Genji, the son of an ancient emperor, and makes keen observations on court life and aristocratic society.

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7 hours ago, Heather Shay said:

The first novel in the world was written in c. 1000 CE by Murasaki Shikibu, a Japanese woman.

Murasaki Shikibu

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  • Photo Credit: Alchetron

Written in the early 11th century, The Tale of Genji is now a classic of Japanese literature. Author Murasaki Shikibu was a noblewoman and lady-in-waiting, who became a cultural innovator for her great work. The original manuscript was made in the orihon style of pasting several sheets of paper together and folding them in alternating directions. In the early 20th century, the book was first translated into modern Japanese, and has since been translated into dozens of languages. The book follows the life of Hikaru Genji, the son of an ancient emperor, and makes keen observations on court life and aristocratic society.

I know this one. I'll have to brush up on my Japanese. Murasaki wrote The Diary of Lady Murasaki, a volume of poetry, and The Tale of Genji. Within a decade of its completion, Genji was distributed throughout the provinces; within a century it was recognized as a classic of Japanese literature and had become a subject of scholarly criticism. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M 

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The world's youngest published author is Dorothy Straight, who wrote How The World Began at 4 years old in 1962.

 

There are more public libraries than McDonald's in America, with 16,766 public libraries compared to 14,157 McDonald's.

 

The longest ever book title consists of over 3,700 words and 26,000 characters.

 

The first book ever written on a typewriter was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.

 

The world's oldest continually operating library was established in AD 565. It is housed in Saint Catherine's Monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai in Egypt, and has the second largest collection of ancient manuscripts after the Vatican City.

 

After following over 17,000 people in England, Scotland and Wales over 50 years, researchers at Edinburgh University proved that reading well at age seven was linked to better socio-economic status even 35 years on.

 

Reading proved 600% better at fighting stress than playing a video game.

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Fox species are quite different from one another, and typically will not share territory.  Gray foxes and red foxes avoid each other, and have unique behaviors.  For example, Gray foxes can climb trees with their cat-like claws. 

 

GrayFox-Climbing_up_tree.jpg

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The average adult spends more time on the toilet than they do exercising.

According to a 2017 study by British non-profit UKActive, adults spend an average of 3 hours and 9 minutes on the toilet each week, but only spend around 1  hour and 30 minutes being physically active during that same time span. Maybe this somewhat useless, but also motivating fact is what we needed to hear to get to the gym.

 

A "jiffy" is about one trillionth of a second.

You've probably said you'll be "back in a jiffy" at least a few times in your life. But what you might not realize is that you made a promise you couldn't keep. According to Dictionary.com, a "jiffy" is an actual unit of time—and a very short one at that. Sometime during the late 18th or early 19th centuries, scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis defined a jiffy as the amount of time it takes light to travel one centimeter in a vacuum, which is about 33.4 picoseconds or one trillionth of a second. That's a short (and pretty much useless) amount of time indeed!

 

 

Maryland tried to ban Randy Newman's song "Short People."

In 1977, Randy Newman sang, "Short people got no reason to live … Well, I don't want no short people … Round here." Although it's meant to be a satirical take on short-sighted people's intolerance and prejudice, the state of Maryland didn't take kindly to the tune. In 1978, delegate Isaiah Dixon Jr. tried to introduce legislation to make it illegal to play the song on the radio, proposing a $500 fine. However, his effort was unsuccessful; the assistant attorney general deemed that the move would be a violation of the First Amendment.

 

The chicken and the ostrich are the closest living relatives of the Tyrannosaurus rex.

While we used to think that dinosaurs were giant lizard-like creatures that roamed the earth, it's now widely accepted that dinosaurs have more in common with present-day birds than they do with oversized reptiles. Research out of Harvard University in 2008 confirmed that the Tyrannosaurus rex shared more of its genetic makeup with ostriches and chickens than with alligators and crocodiles.

 
 
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21 hours ago, miz miranda said:

In 1977, Randy Newman sang, "Short people got no reason to live …

Anyone that couldn't tell this was a parody wasn't thinking too much.  Its still a message we need to hear. 
 

Thats a beautiful photo of a Gray Fox!

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Creedence Clearwater Revival has the most No. 2 Billboard hits—without ever hitting No. 1.
Creedence Clearwater Revival Debut Album Cover Fantasy

John Fogerty's swamp rock band has the odd distinction of having seen more of its singles hit No. 2 on the charts, without ever hitting No. 1, than any other musical act. Between March 1969 and Oct. 1970, the band scored five No. 2 singles on the Billboard Top 100—"Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Green River," "Travelin' Band," and "Lookin' Out My Back Door"—but never saw one of its songs get to the top spot. No other act has topped this dubious honor since.

 
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CCR is one of my all time favorite bands and this is astounding! I'm surprised by this, especially when you factor in songs like Fortunate Song, Have you Ever Seen the Rain etc. 

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Sweden celebrates Christmas with a giant, straw Yule Goat.
Gavle Coat in Sweden at night MATS ASTRAND/TT/AFP via Getty Images

In Scandinavian countries, the Yule goat figures into the Christmas decor of many homes. In Norse mythology, the two goats pulled Thor's flying chariot the same way reindeer do for Santa's sleigh. On top of that, there's also a festive tale that focuses on an invisible Yule goat that checks in on holiday prep before the big day. That's why, in 1966, the Gävle Goat was created in an effort to draw shoppers to the Swedish city where it resides. Standing 42.6 feet high and seven meters in length, it also weighs a whopping 3.6 tons.

 

In Ukraine, spiders are considered symbols of good luck at Christmas.
christmas shaped christmas ornament Shutterstock

When you think about Christmas creatures, reindeer and polar bears probably jump to mind… but what about spiders? In Ukraine, families often add spider web ornaments to their trees as a nod to a lovely seasonal story about the critters once using their silky string to decorate the tree of a poor widow and her children.

 

The Christmas tree pickle is a tradition to keep eager kids calm on Christmas morning.
christmas pickle Shutterstock

According to Today, the Christmas pickle is more than just a common ornament, it's a tradition. As the quirky tradition goes, the first child to find the glass pickle hidden in the tree on Christmas morning either wins a prize or the privilege of opening the first gift. The goal? To keep kids from rushing through the process of opening presents, and instead take the time to enjoy each one.

 

You can recycle your Christmas tree by donating it to elephants.
christmas tree on top of a car Shutterstock

When the holidays are over and it's time to get rid of your Christmas tree, you could drag it to the curb to be picked up by garbage collectors or you could donate it to a zoo so that it can be fed to a hungry elephant. Zoos around the world, including The Elephant Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tennessee, accept evergreens, which are enjoyed by the giant herbivores as a seasonal snack.

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some strange Christmas Traditions

 

Italy: The Christmas Witch

In many cultures, Santa Claus is the person that travels around the world and delivers gifts to deserving young boys and girls on Christmas Eve. Kids are told to be good because Santa is watching them and will know if they behave! On Christmas morning, good kids are rewarded with gifts from this iconic figure.

But in Italy, there's someone else delivering gifts. Befana is the name of a witch in Italy who is said to travel around Italy on Epiphany Eve (January 5th) to deliver gifts to children all over the country. If the children were good all year, their socks are filled with candy and gifts. But if they were bad? They get nothing but coal.

 

Iceland: The Yule Cat

Animals are a big part of a lot of the mythology and traditions of many countries. In Iceland, there's a special Christmas tradition that involves a very special cat that roams the streets one time per year.

But this cat isn't the cute, friendly, four-legged friend that we might imagine roaming the streets of Iceland. According to myths and legends, the Yule Cat is a ferocious creature that wanders around during the winter time and eats anyone who hasn't gotten new clothes to wear on Christmas Eve.

 

Japan: Kentucky Fried Christmas

Many families have a tradition of getting together on holidays like Christmas to enjoy a meal together. Whether it's turkey, ham, or a secret family recipe, enjoying dinner together is a huge part of the holidays for many families. This is also true in Japan! Even though Christmas is celebrated a lot differently and has only started to be celebrated in the past few decades, it's still popular for a lot of people.

So, what's the special meal that people eat during Christmas in Japan? KFC! In the 1970s, KFC in Japan started advertising a special campaign during the winter called Kentucky for Christmas. During Christmas, KFC sells a special range of family dinners meant to help people celebrate the holiday together.

 

South Africa: Fried Caterpillars

There are some foods around the world that are slightly strange to people that don't live there. Some of them are surprisingly delicious once you give them a chance, but then there are others that we could never imagine trying.

In South Africa, there's one really unusual food that tends to be eaten during the Christmas season. It's fried, crispy, and they say it's delicious. What is it? Fried caterpillars! On Christmas Day, people in South Africa snack on deep-fried caterpillars.

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      https://www.newwaysministry.org/2024/03/04/as-a-catholic-doctor-i-know-gender-affirming-care-is-essential-for-transgender-youth/     Carolyn Marie
    • Birdie
      I'm not sure for most, but in my case all my friends when out and about are cis women. I'm accepted right into the fold and we have normal 'girl talk' conversations.  We talked about everything from female issues (yeah I get some of those) to shopping and sales.  We talked about cute guys, and some of our dates as well.    I really don't have any 'guy friends', more like acquaintances.    Even when I was in boy-mode I was never accepted into the fold with the guys and always hung out with the girls. They could sense I was different. Of course the guys didn't have to deal with monthly cramps and such, but I did. 
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    • awkward-yet-sweet
      I can't tell if the Moms for Liberty group is focused only on school libraries or if they look at general public libraries as well.  Because the purpose of those venues is rather different.  I see school libraries as a much more focused collection, especially for the younger grades. In this topic's headline story, the South Carolina library in question is a public library   I did check out some of the "60 Minutes" interview, and I'm suspicious.  Seems it was filmed in October but heavily edited and only released recently.  Typical establishment media stuff.  I think one of the worst things you can say about MFL is that they assumed the presentation would be unbiased and consented to participate.  I would have thought they'd be smarter than that.    It seems the book banning efforts aren't particularly coordinated.  They get together in a group and rate books on a 1 to 5 scale on issues like nudity or sexual descriptions.  Local folks then see what titles are on the shelves, and decide whether they want to get rid of everything that's a 3 or greater, or just a 5....something like that.  I doubt efforts are consistent from place to place. 
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      Being stuck with unfriendly parents and not having choices can really suck.  I lived in that situation until I was 26.  I even was forced to attend a "light" version of conversion therapy to get any support from my parents to get the art training I wanted after high school.  I was fine when my sister still lived at home, but she moved in with a girlfriend and left me with my parents.  That was the most depressed I've ever been.    But situations do change - sometimes that change happens to us, and sometimes we make it for ourselves.  Rather than focusing on the dread of what you think might be happening politically, why not make a list of things you'd like to change and how you might accomplish that?  For example, if you want to move out, you'll need money.  Focus on earning money in any way possible, and saving it up while you have the advantage of a roof over your head.  Is there somewhere you would rather live?  Check out what life might be like there.  If you don't know anybody there, maybe meet a couple of people online, or see if a local friend might want to go there with you when the time comes.    Sometimes having a good future means laying groundwork for that future ahead of time.  There are things you can do, and any little way that you can start preparing will make you feel like you have some agency in your life.  It sets a goal and a timeframe, and goalposts by which you can measure your progress.  There is hope, and you can do it!
    • awkward-yet-sweet
      Pretty sure there's a wide gap between how you and I see the world...which is fine, as it makes things interesting!  To me, sending a message to cis folks that I'm not like them is absolutely the opposite of what I try to do.  I'd rather be seen for my similarities than my differences at most times.  You mention people seeking their tribe - which has certainly been a big thing in my life.  But is a trans person's tribe necessarily other trans folks?  Would we expect the same from members of other minority groups?  Are Black people supposed to seek out other Black people to spend time with?  Are Greek people (like me) supposed to seek out members of the Greek diaspora in the US?  What about people of a specific faith - are they supposed to spend time only with their faith community?  What about those of us who are LGBTQ+, an ethnic minority, and of a specific faith?  Which aspect of a person's identity takes priority?    I wonder if by focusing on finding the LGBTQ+ tribe and emphasizing how different that tribe is from others, if some people might be missing out on greater acceptance that they might find otherwise?    Isn't it also a question of degree?  For example, one of my friends works as custodian in the main building of my husband's workplace.  She's trans, very feminine, and she looks really nice in feminine clothes and feels comfortable expressing herself like that.  But isn't there a difference between an outfit of subdued colors/modest cut/small accent jewelry vs. a different outfit that is in bright colors/revealing, or even something overtly LGBTQ+ oriented?  Both hypothetical outfits could be described as feminine, but one attracts attention and the other doesn't.  Which is the better choice for her in the workplace?  In the grocery store?  Is the hypothetical subdued outfit more likely to make my friend look and feel less feminine or experience dysphoria than the one that draws more attention?  (And to avoid the "false dilemma" fallacy, these are just two examples - avoiding vs attracting attention is likely a wide spectrum of options.)    There's also an issue in that we can be misunderstood or misidentified by the clothes we wear (or don't.)  For example, you mention me being a "nudist."  Actually, that doesn't identify me correctly....there's subtle differences in purpose and beliefs.  But I couldn't blame folks for assuming that if I showed up totally without clothing.  The principle applies to how folks dress when they want to express themselves.  Even if they mean to find their tribe and identity with it, what impression is left on those around them?    I think that activism and appearance are very linked in this way - that the intended meaning may be very different than what is actually communicated to those around us.  It is perhaps a source of much of the friction we deal with.        I wonder if people are different on this as well.  If I'm not feeling safe, the last thing I want to do is be noticed.  Since getting assaulted 18 months ago, I definitely am quieter and I don't put myself out there as much.  Is it a privilege to be quiet?  I kind of disagree.  I think the real privilege might be that when you aren't quiet, when you're attracting more attention than necessary, yet not experiencing something negative from that. 
    • Vidanjali
      So like a mathematician to think in binary terms lol. There is illogic in my boy's statement though as he begs the question (logical fallacy when an argument's conclusion assumes the truth of its premise instead of supporting it) by assuming first that there is (1) something wrong with the world and (2) only one thing wrong with the world. Besides that, he seems to denounce the natural diversity in human intelligence & assume that the wise should ideally assume some sort of active leadership or control (not to mention his assertion is elitist). Moreover, isn't it so that those who are full of doubt truly are not so wise? As a counter example, many enlightened sages have said that self-realization is the highest attainment and that exuded genuineness is what inspires others, not activity, per se. 
    • April Marie
      Hmmmm, following Carolyn Marie's lead......I'm not sure. 😉🤣
    • VickySGV
      The MFL group has actually been voted out of several school boards recently, which is a good start to undo their mischief.  How many of them are actually mothers of children, and which of them are under investigation by Child Protective Services agencies?? 
    • MaeBe
    • Ashley0616
      It's fun to do. I found a free editor called Camtasia. I'll start using that. Let me know when you do. I'll be a first subscriber. 
    • MaeBe
      I do not. I might have to with all you superstars putting yourself out there though!
    • Ashley0616
      Thank you! Do you have one?
    • MaeBe
      Good for you, Ashley! Subbed! 🤩   💜Mae
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