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Fun Friday Fact - hope you respond weekly to give us all a smile


Heather Shay

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14 hours ago, Marcie Jensen said:

eat blackeyed peas on New Year's day for good luck.

With collards 

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My wife eats both of those.  Yuck!  

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In order, Christmas, New Year's Day, my birthday, and Martin Luther King's birthday, all fall on the same day of the week. This year, that would be Saturday--perfect for celebrating!

 

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1. Nail polish originated in China as early as 3000 BC.
The ingredients included beeswax, egg whites, gelatin, and vegetable dyes. In Ancient Egypt, nail polish was even used to signify class rankings: The lower class often wore nude and light colors, while high society painted their nails red. (No wonder red manis are so iconic!)

 

2. The invention of the car spurred the creation of the first modern-day nail polish.
Inspired by automobile paint, a completely colorless version was introduced in 1916. Revlon became the first established nail polish brand in 1932 when they released a cream color.

3. Essie currently sells 311 colors of nail polish, not including nail decals or specialty base and top coats.
You can even buy them in vending machines in airports and malls around the country.

4. Acrylic nails were introduced in 1978.
And they were invented by a dentist.

5. In 1934, a bottle of Cutex nail polish cost 35 cents.
It was only available in three shades of red.

6. The most expensive nail polish costs $250,000.
Nope, that's not a typo. The color, Black Diamond King, is made with 267 carats worth of black diamonds.

7. In 2012, nail polish sales reached $768 million.
This was a 32% increase over 2011, and was probably due to a rise in nail art mania.

8. Actress Rita Hayworth popularized red nail polish.
After the introduction of Technicolor, Rita's bold nails launched a polish movement. Much later, Uma Thurman would start a new trend of vamp-colored nails, thanks to her hit role in Pulp Fiction.

9. There are 13 types of nail polish finishes.
And they include: shimmer, micro-shimmer, micro-glitter, glitter, frost, lustre, crème, prismatic micro-glitter or shimmer, iridescent, opalescent, matte, duo-chrome, and translucent.

10. Opened bottles of nail polish only last about two years.
Unopened bottles can last indefinitely. But once you twist the cap off for the first time, certain ingredients evaporate, which changes the formula and consistency of your polish.

11. Some nail polishes have food in them.
Well, food extract that is. Nails Inc. recently launched a brand of nail polish with kale, which they claim will smooth and brighten nails. Londontown Lakur's formula includes garlic to strengthen and harden nails, while others have cucumber that allegedly prevents splitting.

12. You shouldn't throw your nail polish away.
The EPA considers nail polish a household hazardous waste so you should technically toss your unused bottles in a hazardous waste facility. (However, even the EPA says it's impossible to regulate every household, so there is an exemption to waste generated by normal household activities.)

13. Storing nail polish in the bathroom is a big no-no.
And contrary to some reports, you shouldn't put polish in the fridge either. The chill will cause the polish to crystalize, which breaks down the formula. Instead, keep polish in a dry, room temperature space without direct contact to sunlight.

14. Painting your nails is prohibited on airplanes.
One woman was even arrested for painting her nails on a flight. She did also use profane language and refuse to stop, but overall, most airlines frown upon nail lacquer in the sky.

15. Neon nail polish is technically illegal.
Or at least the FDA hasn't approved them yet. Certain colorants used to create neon and glow-in-the-dark polishes are not allowed, but that doesn't mean you won't find them on beauty shelves. Many companies like OPI use formulas with FDA-approved coloring, while your other favorite neon polishes are imported.

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Some 'facts' related to the concept known as dating, from :Moira Weigel's Labor of Love: The Invention of Dating

 

IT WASN'T ALWAYS CALLED "DATING."

According to Weigel, “date,” in the context of relationships, reaches back to 1896. It was first used in a newspaper column in which a young man laments that his girlfriend is seeing other people—that they are "fillin' all my dates," as in "the dates on her calendar."

 

IN 1900, DATING COULD BE A FELONY.

At the turn of last century, dating was still a new concept and law enforcement wasn't sure what to make of it—but they were sure something sordid was going on. A young man and woman meeting in public, him buying her food, drink, and gifts: well, it was veritable prostitution in the eyes of authorities, and women could be arrested for it.

 

 

DEPARTMENT STORES CHANGED EVERYTHING.

Department stores brought those of humble means into contact with those of wealth. The shopgirl selling fashion learned to imitate her buyers, and labels would come along that could let anyone look rich. "Driven by anxiety, as well as romantic ambition," writes Weigel, "the shopgirl drove a kind of arms race. The more effectively she sold fashion and beauty culture to her clients, the more mandatory participation in that culture became. It was just what the economy needed."

 

WEARING MAKEUP HAS ITS ROOTS IN DATING.

Before the 1900s, the only women who wore "painted faces" were actresses and prostitutes. (Previously, a natural look, it was said, demonstrated "clean living.") To make their product mainstream, the cosmetics industry renamed their goods "makeup," with the lofty, admirable goal of "making oneself up" to express femininity.

 

DATING INTRODUCED PRIVACY TO THE PROCESS OF COURTSHIP.

Ironically, a man and a woman meeting in public was the best way to have some privacy. Before dating, courtship involved suitors calling on prospective partners in the family home. And since McMansions were not yet a thing, it meant the parlor or kitchen, where there were always eyes and ears close by.

 

DATING QUICKLY BECAME A BIG BUSINESS.

Before dating came into the picture, "courtship" and "calling" were conducted with the express goal of marriage. It was a family affair, as callers meant heirs, property, and happiness. The newly established dating industry, however, had other goals in mind. Marriage would hurt business. "For the first time in human history," writes Weigel, "dating made it necessary to buy things in order to get face time with a prospective partner. This remains true today."

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15 hours ago, miz miranda said:

IN 1900, DATING COULD BE A FELONY.

At the turn of last century, dating was still a new concept and law enforcement wasn't sure what to make of it—but they were sure something sordid was going on. A young man and woman meeting in public, him buying her food, drink, and gifts: well, it was veritable prostitution in the eyes of authorities, and women could be arrested for it.

 

The part where THE WOMAN could get arrested for it always bugs me. It can't be the guy who approached her with gifts. It's HER fault for tempting him. Grr.

 

Hugs!

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2 hours ago, Jackie C. said:

The part where THE WOMAN could get arrested for it always bugs me. It can't be the guy who approached her with gifts. It's HER fault for tempting him.

Kinda twisted when you think about it.

Goes back to Eve, Pandora, etc.

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3 hours ago, Jandi said:

Kinda twisted when you think about it.

Goes back to Eve, Pandora, etc.

 

Oh yeah. I watched an Imam pontificate about how effeminate young boys need to cover their sinful bodies up so as not to tempt God-fearing men. It's never the man's fault. It's always the woman for wearing provocative clothing, or changing her mind or just being available. Toxic masculinity is EVERYWHERE in modern society and it's super gross.

 

Hugs!

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2 hours ago, Jackie C. said:

so as not to tempt God-fearing men

So do we equate god-fearing with sexual predator?  I would think (hope) not but that's what this Imam was preaching!  

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3 hours ago, Jani said:

So do we equate god-fearing with sexual predator?  I would think (hope) not but that's what this Imam was preaching!  

 

That was kind of my point. "I can't be a sexual predator! She/he/they tempted me!!!"

 

Again, men are gross. Men in power tend to be doubly so.

 

Hugs!

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When the Fenway Community Health Center in Boston was founded in 1973, each patient was charged 50¢ or, “whatever you can pay" for each visit.  Their transgender patients now total more than 5,100.

 

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@Davie wow that's a lot of people.  I know my doctor commented about having patients in ME when I mentioned where I lived.  Its a great place with nice people.

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Wow what a thought for today....

1. Trans people have always been around.

We’re often overlooked or erased in history and language has changed, but there are countless examples of trans people throughout history.

Read more: https://www.autostraddle.com/10-lesser-known-trans-women-pioneers-from-history-316582/

 

2. Non-binary people have always existed.

You might not have heard the word “non-binary” until recently, but cultures around the world have long recognised that there are more than two genders.

Read more: https://www.pbs.org/independentlens/content/two-spirits_map-html/

 

3. Trans adults started off as trans children.

It goes without saying that all trans adults started off as children. The Metro Youth Chances Report (2014) found that 2 in 5 trans young people (aged 16-25) realised that they were trans when they were age 11 or under. One major difference today in comparison to 20 years ago is that there are more openly trans people, meaning that trans children and young people realise that they aren’t alone in their feelings.

Read more: https://metrocharity.org.uk/

 

4. Trans people face high levels of harassment and discrimination.

Despite improved acceptance of trans people in society, trans people still face high levels of harassment and discrimination. 51% of trans people have hidden their identity at work for fear of discrimination. Nearly 7 in 10 trans young people have been subjected to death threats at school.

Read more: https://www.stonewall.org.uk/lgbt-britain-trans-report

Read more: https://www.stonewall.org.uk/school-report-2017

 

5. There is a biological basis for gender identity.

Medical literature, including studies of trans and intersex people, shows that there is a biological basis for gender identity.

Read more: https://www.endocrine.org/news-and-advocacy/position-statements/transgender-health

 

6. There is more to sex and gender than XX and XY chromosomes.

Sex is more complicated than your GCSE biology textbook would have you believe. This fact is borne out by the existence of intersex people. In fact, it’s incredibly complicated so do read the article below for more information.

Read more: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/sex-redefined-the-idea-of-2-sexes-is-overly-simplistic1/

 

7. Trans people aren’t all attracted to women.

As is the case with the wider population, different trans people have different sexual or romantic orientations. Trans men can be straight, gay, bi, ace or identify their orientation in another way. Trans women can be straight, lesbian/gay, bi, ace or identify their orientation in a different way. Non-binary people can be attracted exclusively to men, women, non-binary people or they could be bi, ace or identify their orientation in another way too.

Read more: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/lou-sullivans-diaries-are-a-radical-testament-to-trans-happiness

 

8. Before 1971, trans people had some access to gender recognition.

Sir Ewan Forbes changed the sex on his birth certificate in the 1940s, announced his new name in the newspaper and legally married his wife. His cousin challenged the change for reasons of inheritance, but the judge ruled in Ewan’s favour. However, things changed in 1971 when April Ashley’s husband had their marriage annulled because he claimed that she was ‘a man’ because of being trans. Trans people in the UK were then left without access to gender recognition until the introduction of the Gender Recognition Act in 2004.

Read more: https://www.makingqueerhistory.com/articles/2016/12/20/sir-ewan-forbes-the-doctor

Read more: http://www.pfc.org.uk/caselaw/Corbett%20v%20Corbett.pdf

 

9. Trans people without a gender recognition certificate are able to access single-sex spaces and services.

The Equality Act (2010) protects trans people under the protected characteristic of “gender reassignment” from the start of social transition. This protection applies regardless of the age of the trans person, regardless of them being under medical supervision and regardless of what it says on their birth certificate. Under the act, trans men have the right to be treated the same as other man and have the right to access male only spaces and services. Similarly, trans women have the right to be treated the same as any other woman and have the right to access female only spaces and services. Non-binary people are protected under the “gender reassignment” characteristic of the Equality Act.

There is a legal basis for excluding trans people from single-sex spaces or services, however the law is clear in stating that these decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis and it must be a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim. It is worth noting that the legal bar for this is incredibly high. You’ll find more information on the Equality Act (2010) here.

There is an exception when it comes to sports, please scroll down for more detailed information.

Read more: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/contents

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/consumer/discrimination-in-the-provision-of-goods-and-services/discrimination-in-the-provision-of-goods-and-services1/goods-and-services-what-are-the-different-types-of-discrimination/what-doesn-t-count-as-unlawful-discrimination-in-goods-and-services/single-sex-and-separate-services-for-men-and-women-when-discrimination-is-allowed/

 

10. Trans people’s right to self-determination is grounded in international best practice.

The OHCR (Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights) states that it is international best practice to allow trans people self-determination with regards to gaining legal recognition. Many countries allow trans people to gain legal gender recognition by signing a statutory declaration. Trans people are able to access self-determination in countries including Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Denmark, Ireland, India, Malta, Norway, Pakistan, Portugal and Uruguay. You can read more about trans people in the UK’s rights to legal gender recognition here.

Read more: https://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Discrimination/Pages/LivingFreeEqual.aspx

 

11. Non-binary people’s access to legal gender recognition is grounded in international best practice.

The OHCR (Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights) states that it is international best practice to allow non-binary people access to legal gender recognition. The following countries offer legal recognition to people who don’t identify as male or female (this includes non-binary people, but may also include people that identify in a different way): Austria, Iceland, India, Pakistan, Uruguay. Non-binary people are also offered legal recognition in some parts of Australia, Canada and USA. You can read more about the rights of non-binary people in the UK here.

Read more: https://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Discrimination/Pages/LivingFreeEqual.aspx

 

12. There are very few trans people in UK prisons.

Despite facing disproportionate levels of discrimination and financial hardship, trans people in the UK are less likely to be in prison than the general population. The Ministry of Justice reports low numbers of trans prisoners, with trans people constituting an estimated 0.16% of the UK prison population. If they don’t have a Gender Recognition Certificate, trans people in UK prisons are automatically placed in a prison that corresponds with the sex they were assigned at birth. To be transferred to a prison that corresponds to their gender identity, their case must be heard by the local case board and by the complex case board. All assessments are made on a case by case basis and are informed by a thorough risk assessment process. Transgender women with a Gender Recognition Certificate must be placed in the women’s estate unless there are exceptional circumstances. This is the same arrangement as for cisgender women, with decision making informed by a thorough risk assessment processes.

Read more: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/863610/transgender-pf.pdf

 

13. No openly trans person has ever won an Olympic medal.

Trans people have been able to compete in the Olympics since 2004, when the International Olympic Committee first issued guidelines. Contrary to what some people might believe, trans people are not dominating international sport. In fact, no openly trans person has ever won an Olympic medal following transition.

Read more: https://stillmed.olympic.org/Documents/Commissions_PDFfiles/Medical_commission/2015-11_ioc_consensus_meeting_on_sex_reassignment_and_hyperandrogenism-en.pdf

 

14. Most trans people are happy that they transitioned.

Most trans people are happy that they transitioned and 99% of trans people have no regrets about undergoing gender confirmation surgeries. A tiny minority of people do detransition and might do so for a number of reasons including family or societal rejection.

Read more: https://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&lr=&id=-qtlZDCMAZ4C&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Transgenderism+and+intersexuality+in+childhood+and+adolescence&ots=A5xWOLWIy7&sig=fLXP6sATZHxEQAmPW4t8WlRJVlg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Transgenderism%20and%20intersexuality%20in%20childhood%20and%20adolescence&f

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6 hours ago, Heather Shay said:

Wow what a thought for today....

@Heather ShayThanks so much for this. History, scholarship, beautifully collected and written. It's so great to have this. So important to a solid feeling of identity in the world. Makes me proud to be here, to be me.

yours,

Davie

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