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Guest KaylaK

Voices And Other Psychotic Events That Happen Infrequently Andc Are Controlled By Medication

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Guest KaylaK

I hear voices, and I know they are my thoughts. They say only what i want them to say, and I have strict rules as to what they are allowed to say.

Frequently they are memories of what someone has told me earlier or things I want to share with someone else and I know their names and I can get the real persons response.

My question, since I have never had a psychotic break on my meds, does that mean there is no hope for me in the eye's of the medical prfession since I know the cause of my psychosis is an over active imagination?

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Guest Phoebe
I hear voices, and I know they are my thoughts. They say only what i want them to say, and I have strict rules as to what they are allowed to say.

Frequently they are memories of what someone has told me earlier or things I want to share with someone else and I know their names and I can get the real persons response.

My question, since I have never had a psychotic break on my meds, does that mean there is no hope for me in the eye's of the medical prfession since I know the cause of my psychosis is an over active imagination?

Hi, Kaylak :)

I don't think it's considered "psychotic" until you are losing touch with reality but in truth, it sounds like you are pretty well grounded. I don't think it is uncommon for people to have a sort of separate voice in their mind-- that is what my therapists have said. If you have one to talk to, I hope he would say the same

In fact, your voice sounds like it is reasonably well-trained! If you think it is a product of a big imagination, then that is something that might be celebratory. At worst, it may be sort of like an imaginary friend.

In my case (and boy, do I have a long case of this) my little inner voice found the most nasty, unhelpful, condescending and hurtful thing it could possibly tell me. It cast grey over the best of times, and was sort of like stabbing me a few extra times in the back when things were not. No medication was ever prescribed for this, and my therapists and I tried to conquer it through specific cognitive therapy techniques.

You mention your fear there is "no hope" for anything. I don't think that is ever true. If you ever get a chance, check out some writings of Oliver Sacks who writes about the strangest sorts of neurological problems and how even if it seems like there is "no hope" then there's reasons to go on with it :). It sometimes seems to me that Dr. Sacks uses an over-active imagination in looking for the problems he finds, so I think that is always something to be celebrated.

Take care, and write more about it if you would like.

Phoebe

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Carolyn Marie

Hon, I think Phoebe nailed it with her reply.

There is a huge difference between your imagination, which we all have and need, and hearing voices that tell you

to do things which you feel compelled to obey. If you are completely aware of these voices, and its just your inner

self conversing with you, and you can stop it at will, I doubt if you are psychotic or anything close.

But, I am not a pschologist or pschiatriatist and no one on these boards can tell you anything for sure. If you are

concerned, please talk to a therapist. They can properly advise you and offer whatever you may need in the way of

counseling.

Try not to worry, OK?

Carolyn Marie

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Guest Leigh

first i want to urge you not to think that you are crazy just because "hearing voices" is a supposed sign of mental illness.

i'm fairly certain everyone "hears voices" to a certain extent. what's more important is what the voices are saying.

also, i see no reason why this should prevent you from transitioning. just make sure you're being open with your therapist.

best wishes.

peace&love

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Guest Elizabeth K
Hon, I think Phoebe nailed it with her reply.

There is a huge difference between your imagination, which we all have and need, and hearing voices that tell you

to do things which you feel compelled to obey. If you are completely aware of these voices, and its just your inner

self conversing with you, and you can stop it at will, I doubt if you are psychotic or anything close.

But, I am not a pschologist or pschiatriatist and no one on these boards can tell you anything for sure. If you are

concerned, please talk to a therapist. They can properly advise you and offer whatever you may need in the way of

counseling.

Try not to worry, OK?

Carolyn Marie

Look up and see some good advice!

Carolyn Marie also nails it!

And yes - I read your question as a simpler thing - can you transition? Well... a threapist trained in gender dysphotia can tell you.

.................................

I had a milder thing - two voices in my head - EVERY DECISION I would try to make these two would come in and argue!

"I wannaa do xxxxx"

"You should do yyyyy"

"I would be better doing xxxxx!"

'But guys do yyyyy - you will look different!"

" I don't care!'

and so on.....

My therapist said I was referring to myself in the third person all the time - and I had to learn to be what I am! So I quit talking about Elizabeth, and I became her. I unified the two voices - they are gone now.

So I told her originally I thought the duality of the two voices were the male me and the female me. Unified, I discovered they were both female me - just one was afraid to transition, the other was not. GO FIGURE...

So we do talk about our voices to our therapists - mine said I was okay, especially as I finally unified the two I had. I guess i was never at any point compelled to act on what they said - and always thought they were two parts of me wrestling with decisions - exaggerated by my dual nature.

I am in transition - so my therapist seemed to think I was okay to move to the next step.

I don't know if this helps!

Lizzy

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Sakura

the simplest way to explain this is " its your internal monologue " or basicly what your thinking consously , things you think about saying but dont say.( or do say if the situation calls for it ) every one in the world has this its a healthy way colecting your thoughts before you speak or act on something

i doubt there is anything wrong with you because you are aware that it is your own voice and thoughts so rest easy :)

Sakura

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