Jump to content
  • Welcome to the TransPulse Forums!

    We offer a safe, inclusive community for transgender and gender non-conforming folks, as well as their loved ones, to find support and information.  Join today!

Guest Alexx21

any Buddhist here ?

Recommended Posts

Guest Alexx21

Any Buddhist here ?

the last post for anything has been in march and most of the people who posted here have been deleted

am a new Buddhist just learning about it

Share this post


Link to post
Charlize

I sat Zen for several years while at university but consider myself more spiritual than part of a religion.

Hugs,

Charlize

Share this post


Link to post
Cecilia
On 7/23/2016 at 0:30 PM, Alexx21 said:

Any Buddhist here ?

the last post for anything has been in march and most of the people who posted here have been deleted

am a new Buddhist just learning about it

I am just seeking to start my journey into Buddhism.  I grew up Orthodox Jewish, then as a young adult became Born Again.  That did not feel right to my soul and biblical infallibility and biblical inerrancy did not sit right with my scientific mind and critical thinking approach to life.  I became Agnostic for decades after that but on the fringe of my world I kept being attracted to Buddhism.  The passing of my dog and my transgender journey bring me back to Buddhism.  I just wrote to the Buddhist Temple near me and am hoping to hear back.  Their website says they allow visitors daily at 11 AM as they give Alms to the Monks (https://khmertempleutica.wordpress.com/).  I hope to be invited via a response email soon.

Share this post


Link to post
onaquest

Well, new to the forum, but not new to transition or Buddhism, let's get this topic rolling

Share this post


Link to post
Charlize

Welcome to the forums Onaquest.  You may want to post an introduction in that forum.  As to Buddhism it seems a topic that can either roll or sit under a tree.  How do you feel?

 

Hugs,

 

Charlize

Share this post


Link to post
onaquest

:D Buddhism is such a broad topic. Simply "Buddhism" is perhaps too broad given all the various sects and such. I am terrible at introductions, so I just wildly jump in feet first.

Share this post


Link to post
Charlize

As an alcoholic in recovery i recently started to explore the relationship between the cravings of the world, my addiction and buddhism.  This article explores this beautifully.

 

Buddhism and the 12 Steps

July 16, 2014

Buddhas

By Roger C.

There would appear to be much in common between Buddhist thought and the 12 Step recovery program practised by some in AA.

A number of books have made the connection between them.

Three of the more popular ones include Kevin Griffin’s work, One Breath at a Time: Buddhism and the 12 Steps, published in 2004. That was followed in 2009 by Darren Littlejohn’s well-known work, The 12-Step Buddhist.

And a third is Thérèse Jacobs-Stewart’s book, Mindfulness and the 12 Steps, published in 2010.

Buddhist thought holds that craving leads to suffering (the second noble truth). Twenty-five hundred years ago the Buddha taught that snippets of addiction – constantly wanting, ever craving this or that – are the source of all human suffering.

 

He also taught that this craving could be reduced and eventually eliminated.

This is where Buddhist mindfulness enters the picture. It can be defined as self-awareness brought about by the practice of meditation.

Meditation leads incrementally towards an “awakening:” an understanding of human interaction in the world that is both craving and delusion-free.

We have the choice to live an awakened life… This is a choice to be mindful, see our patterns, and recognize the delusions that lead us to act the way we do. In Twelve Step terms, it is the practice of taking inventory, searching out what’s driving our actions and reactions, and taking responsibility for it. (Mindfulness and the 12 Steps, p. 52)

It is certainly worth noting that the the “mindfulness” of Buddhism as a way of dealing with addictive behaviour is ever more prevalent in the rooms of AA.

Some time ago Julie B. celebrated a year of sobriety at the We Agnostics meeting on St. Clair Avenue in Toronto. She chose to have one word, an acronym, on her one-year medallion: S.O.B.E.R.

When we have a troubling thought, or a desire to drink, the Buddhist approach is laid out this way:

  • Stop – Pause for a moment and consider what you are doing;
  • Observe – Think about what you are sensing, feeling and experiencing, and what events led to the situation;
  • Breathe – Pause for a few deep breaths in order to assess your situation in as calm a manner as possible;
  • Expand – Expand your awareness and remind yourself of what will happen if you keep repeating the unwanted behavior (and how you will feel afterward);
  • Respond mindfully – Remember that you have a choice, that you are not required to continue the undesired behaviour.

As Jacobs-Stewart puts it, “If we are mindful, we can slow down the reactionary chain of thoughts, feelings, and subsequent actions. We can see the whole cycle.” (p. 81)

This mindfulness approach to dealing with the affliction of alcoholism has grown exponentially over the past few decades. Indeed, it is doing so with or without Buddhism.

In 1990, Jon Kabat-Zin published a ground-breaking book, Full Catastrophe Living, which launched the use of mindfulness meditation as a “stress reduction program.” Called Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), these programs are readily available in most cities from a number of hospitals and doctors and are used to deal with a wide variety of afflictions, including alcoholism.

BuddhaIn fact, the S.O.B.E.R. inscription on Julie’s one-year medallion had its inspiration in an eight-week program based on the Kabat-Zin MBSR model that she had taken in early sobriety at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

It is perhaps also worth mentioning that, like AA, the Buddhist approach places a great deal of emphasis on community or “fellowship” as an important part of maintaining sobriety. Buddhism believe that all beings are interdependant and thus has a profound understanding of the importance of the principle of “one alcoholic helping another alcoholic,” as an important part of recovery.

Many looking for meditation and mindfulness to deal with the affliction of alcoholism turn to the Buddhist Recovery Network, which has been online since 2009. The website “supports the use of Buddhist teachings, traditions and practices to help people recover from the suffering caused by addictive behaviors.” The Buddhist Recovery Network specifically “promotes mindfulness and meditation” as a way of dealing with alcoholism and addiction. On its Resources Page it lists a total of sixteen published books that take a Buddhist approach to working the 12 Steps.

On the Buddhist Recovery Network’s Meetings Page, it lists times and locations for meetings in half a dozen countries. In the United States there are roughly one hundred meetings, with thirty of them in California. Interestingly, at the Alano Club in Portland, Oregon, where a Beyond Belief agnostic AA meeting is held on Sunday mornings, there is also a Buddhist 12 Step Meditation meeting on Tuesday evenings. Indeed, many of these Buddhist recovery meetings involve the 12 Steps.

A Buddhist approach to the 12 Steps can be an important part of achieving what Bill Wilson described as the “personality change sufficient to bring about recovery from alcoholism” in the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous.

Buddhism and the 12 Steps. Do they fit together?

They sure do, for an increasing number of people.


This article is a condensed and gently revised version of Mindfulness and the 12 Steps, originally published on AA Agnostica on September 2, 2012.

Share this post


Link to post
DenimAndLace

I'm a mere casual observer of religions, except for fundamental Christianity of which I was formerly quite entangled but I thought the 12 step process of AA was created by a Christian with overt Christianity interwoven in it.  Or was that just another reach of Christianity to claim more territory?  I honestly don't know.  Is AA Christian?  Is AA Buddhist?  Is it neither or both or is there something about Christianity and Buddhism that are the same?  I personally think it's the latter.

 

This thread caught my attention because, if anything, I consider myself an eclectic theist with Christian leanings.  The "eclectic" quantifier is because I tend to take bits and pieces from any religion that resonates with me.  From the Native Americans, I get my respect for the natural world we live in.  From Christianity, I get my sense of how to treat others.  From Buddhism, I am reminded to be thoughtful, intentional and sensitive to things I don't understand.  Honestly, I could probably get any of those things from any religion but in my high altitude observation, each religion holds some things closer to their core and all the major religions, in my belief, have a key to unlock a greater or prolonged existence for our species.  I also believe that ALL religions (including my "eclectic theism with Christian leanings" and humanism) have poison in them.

Share this post


Link to post
VickySGV

Bill Wilson. who wrote Alcoholics Anonymous did have his own Christian leanings, but one of the Twelve Traditions of AA states that AA does not embrace a single religious doctrine or affiliation.  In the writing style of the time that Bill wrote The Big Book, he did use the male attributions of  "God as we understand him", and some groups do occasionally use the "Our Father" as a closing prayer.  The groups I am part of today are OK with my use of gender neutral or female references to a Higher Power since many of them have had trouble with the Christian religious style in many areas. It is still a problem for some people who were abused in churches and, to quote another reading in AA, "We claim Spiritual Progress rather than spiritual perfection."   

Share this post


Link to post
onaquest

What a fantastic topic! In my many years in and out of the rooms, the one thing that stuck with my spiritual practice had a name and it was Buddhism. MBRP and S.O.B.E.R was a big thing in my last stent in treatment. Another organization is Refuge Recovery, and there are groups here. One meeting there per week is part of my meeting routine. Not clicking with any theistic approach, "of our understanding" really grabbed me in the earliest of days and I hold dearly even today.

Share this post


Link to post
TessaOKC
On 7/23/2016 at 11:30 AM, Guest Alexx21 said:

Any Buddhist here ?

the last post for anything has been in march and most of the people who posted here have been deleted

am a new Buddhist just learning about it

 

Hi Alexx,

 

I studied Buddhism for five years at the Buddha Mind Monastery in Oklahoma City. My children are now Buddhist. Was disappointed that each and every time I showed up there the Shifu's  would corner me and I would work my tail off while my family was together inside. I love to contribute but they really used and abused me. lol. I still go back but I know what to expect. I just don't go as much. The lessons learned during that initial five year period are discussed and used by me and my family each and every day.

 

What I especially like about Buddhism is that it is perfectly acceptable to continue practicing whatever faith you like. I'm Catholic and will always be. I'm also Buddhist.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Rachel Gia

Hi,

Although the basis of my meditation come from a book on Buddism the spiritual aspect of my life is based around being thankful for what I have and for the people I know and to participate with that which is around me the basis of which is understanding and practicing love.

i like Buddism a lot but prefer if people use their own words when conveying something. 

If I had the determination and attention span to read the Quoran and find a Master I would say I would align myself with Sufism but that's not going to happen so I have to be content being an Abrahamist with Big Book leanings.

This is not my own words but sort of in fact.

Love God (your version) and treat others with kindness and love:) The rest is commentary.

Reading this made things easy for me.

In light of the simplicity I feel that spirituality should not possess an inaccessible quality to it. 

Why I like Sufism is the belief that "love is the highest station of the soul."

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online   8 Members, 0 Anonymous, 9 Guests (See full list)

    • VickySGV
    • Jocelyn
    • Rachael
    • Rowan
    • SugarMagnolia
    • nitehwk
    • MaryEllen
    • rufnear
  • Who Was Online

    95 Users were Online in the Last 48 Hours
    • VickySGV
    • Rachael
    • Rowan
    • Jocelyn
    • SugarMagnolia
    • nitehwk
    • MaryEllen
    • rufnear
    • Kirsten
    • Isabelle
    • Zedarius
    • April
    • PurpleBlue
    • Andrea
    • JMG
    • Dakota16
    • Terry
    • Carolyn Marie
    • Summer
    • MaryMary
    • stbSusan
    • JD
    • JJ
    • Jojo
    • Jackie C.
    • Willow
    • Petra Jane
    • Martyn
    • Alexx21
    • Carly Hughes
    • nate775
    • hmillerrr
    • Michelle F
    • NewLife336
    • Alice
    • kotobirbs
    • Lexi
    • claire1000
    • CyndiRae
    • BrandiBri
    • DenimAndLace
    • Notsure2015
    • jae bear
    • KeiraC
    • jo jo
    • Lilyr1999
    • ChickenLittle
    • Jani
    • Elyssia
    • KymmieL
    • Amy LeBlanc
    • CaptainC_Cookies
    • Phoenixrises42016
    • Timber Wolf
    • Charlize
    • Adaline
    • Mickey
    • mochi90
    • Julie J
    • DDan
    • ckd
    • Robin
    • Sophie
    • TiaMaria
    • Joe76
    • tracy_j
    • Cat Lady Kelly
    • Cluck1992
    • Lady Ayu
    • Ashlee
    • Poppycorn95
    • Braxton
    • leomonade
    • JBfox
    • Dev
    • CompressionMan
    • Steff
    • quezadajuarez
    • MolsMags93
    • Ronin82
    • It'sAndrew345
    • Roberta-Belinda
    • Amy joey
    • Carly
    • Sharon Aml
    • bobbisue
    • Cal
    • Fernode
    • ResearchFairy
    • DrumbeatAlex
    • Miss Linnea
    • Max
    • AnnazMom
    • Cheyenne skye
    • Kris
  • Topics With Zero Replies

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      66,250
    • Total Posts
      599,189
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      3,857
    • Most Online
      8,356

    Andrea
    Newest Member
    Andrea
    Joined
  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Posts

    • rufnear
    • rufnear
      Ok, found TransPulse server..lol (don't laugh :P)  but am trying to complete #verification I see where it has a green check mark or Red X to agree or disagree but the text I put box does not work.
    • rufnear
      I can't find anyone on Discord let alone a TransPulse live chat community.  I set up an account on my iPad using browser and downloaded the app too but both look empty.  I thought I had searched for TransPulse Channel but 0 channels by that name were found. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    • VickySGV
      Caveat Emptor -- LET THE BUYER BEWARE   I am long out, and kind of old, but to me nothing beats in-store try-ons.  I found out there were several of the mid-size chains that are gender friendly and have more private, gender neutral changing rooms.  Lane Bryant, and Dress Barn are two that deal with larger women and are very pleasant to us, and tend to have sales personnel who are very helpful, and who do know how to suggest clothing.  The Dillard's and Hot Topic stores are also great at helping us, and keep an eye on the teenage crowd that can be mouthy, but I never have had problems with them.   If you do use the Amazon thing, get two of the same garment one size apart (ie 22 and 24 slacks -- [ok, I am big]) which is what I take into the try-on rooms.  For dresses use the size of your slacks and skirts, also two sizes at a time. 
    • JMG
      Thank you for the responses! What  I should say is that I have developed a sexual desire to my male body, but when my female sides came out, I get in a frustration mood that the dislike of my make body prevents what I usually do sometimes  sexually. Until I finally can come to a care therapist, there is a waiting time of 1-2 years in my  country, I need a temporary solution to feel the lust for this body and still dress female in other aspects of life. There is no way I would run at datings, I don't feel comfortable with another person at this stage.
    • Rowan
      Right?!? I can't tell you how many things I have bought on Amazon that didn't fit right, or just wasn't what I imagined. 
    • Dakota16
      I haven't heard of this until now, but it looks like an awesome service! I'm still trying to develop my style as well
    • Kirsten
      Lol. The “auntie” thing is still so weird to me. My nieces and nephews have been great about it but it’s weird. Almost as weird as when my son accidentally calls me mom. 🤦🏻‍♀️  Haha my wife cringes just a tad when she hears it. Cause I can be whomever I want but I am not mom. She is. And I 100% agree. But that aunty is funny. I think it’s more that I had never really thought about it before.    Jani i I do hope so too. It’s never anything bad persay but it is something. It’s little things that cause her some angst more than upset her. But I really hope it all smooths out. I hate when it does cause her any issue. Her happiness is just as important as mine. And it’s so much better if it can be with me than not. At least for me. Lol. Time time time.  Thanks.  Kirsten 
    • Kirsten
      Julie you could be right. And people have always told me I am very approachable as well. But I’d say almost 3/4 of the time I’m not the one that starts the convos.  Actually the best part of the ladies rooms so far is I’m usually alone in there. But I’m mostly in the restroom the last couple weeks at work. And we are a predominently male company in my area at least. But I’m quickly getting over the fears. There isn’t much to really be scared of. Just be yourself wherever you are. It’ll all go fine. 
    • Alice
    • Carly Hughes
      i agree, with the others saying that confidence is the key, if your acting nervous or scared, people pick up on that, if your walking along and someone is coming the other way, and you stop turn around and walk back the way you have come quickly to get away, just looks odd, and raises peoples suspicions that something isn't right and they will look at you more to try and see whats wrong, if you do not give anyone a reason to stare at you, from my experience they wont, i know its hard to do but sometimes girls like us need balls to brazen it out
    • BrandiBri
      "Not being trans enough"? Bulls..t!!! There is no such thing as not being trans enough. Sadly, as I have read some older threads I have seen that there are people who do believe that nonsense. The sad part of that is they are usually trans themselves. I would hope that no one here would consider me as not being trans enough just because I have not had GRS, just as I don't consider that I am more trans than those who are not on HRT. No matter where we are on our journey, when we feel that we are trans*, then we are trans*. As a side post,  I wonder if anyone has ever been accused of "not being cis enough" because of not wearing the "acceptable" clothes for their anatomy.
    • Carly Hughes
      i must admit that since my separation and being on my own, and my dressing urges have increased by 1000% that i have started  watching what i eat to slim down and achieve a more feminine figure
    • jae bear
      I’ve done a fair amount of research on this topic myself, and the more I read the more I am unsure about the laser process. And the techniques vary so much with Electrolysis you really have to break them down into three different techniques. With electrolysis there is the original method of straight galvanic Electrolysis which is extremely effective but a bit slower in process, however it still achieves the same goal in the same amount of time because it is more effective at killing the follicles if done correctly.  The more common method especially on the East Coast is thermolysis, which  I personally do not believe should be used on facial hair, it uses radio frequency energy to heat the hair follicle and requires many multiple treatments to have successful follicle kill off. The downside of this is the heat generated tends to cook the collagen in your face and has the undesirable effect of making you look older once the process is finished, and a couple years of this process are typically required. The last thing you want is to look older at the end of Electrolysis, so I am avoiding this method even though I have experienced a few months of it already. I now go to a straight galvanic technician and I’m getting fantastic results, I don’t even use the numbing cream at this point since she is so good at what she does. The results for me between the two are dramatic, I had full regrowth with the thermolysis method and some issues with collagen burn, but the straight galvanic process is incredibly effective  and much more manageable for me personally even if it is quite expensive at $80 per hour. The most common method used currently is galvanic blend,  however my experience is now telling me that most operators do not use the galvanic setting But rely heavily on the radio frequency energy of the blend setting and primarily provide thermolysis to their patients, and I would never recommend this after having undergone it myself.  The thing that worries me about laser most is that as I understand it it is mostly effective on extremely dark facial hair that is close to the surface,  which is not very common. Many patients who undergo laser can end up with a permanent shadow under their skin due to the base follicle remaining even though it’s dead.  However it can be removed with straight galvanic process  by opening up the follicle poor with  The galvanic probe and allowing the dark dead hair follicle to work its way to the surface but it’s basically like starting over, so I’m just going with the galvanic process personally. The favorite part of my research on straight galvanic was that it typically results in patient appearing younger after completion,  I will take some of that all day long ! I am sharing a picture  showing the cleared side of my face up to the edge of my mouth, it’s been a couple days growth, and it’s typically what I end up having going to Electrolysis which happens to be tomorrow afternoon. The cleared the side of my face has only had one pass of straight galvanic, but it has been extremely effective where the thermolysis method had been done on that side of my face three or four times with no good results. I am extremely excited for the complete full first pass of my face from one side to the other, as I understand it this takes about 100 hours, but depends on the person and the density of facial hair, mine is quite dense so it might take a bit more time.  Hugs,   Jackie 
    • claire1000
      The key thing is to become comfortable in our own skin not what's covering it.
  • Upcoming Events

×