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Guest Tammy Maher

Unitarian Universalism

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Guest Tammy Maher

I can't belive I haven't seen anyone post this topic yet :o

"Unitarian Universalism is a liberal religion that encompasses many faith traditions. Unitarian Universalists include people who identify as Christians, Jews, Buddhists, Hindus, Pagans, Atheists, Agnostics, Humanists, and others. As there is no official Unitarian Universalist creed, Unitarian Universalists are free to search for truth on many paths." (uua.org)

"There are seven principles which Unitarian Universalist congregations affirm and promote:

  • The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
  • Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
  • Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
  • A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
  • The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
  • The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
  • Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

"

Basically the way I describe my faith is it Paganism without the gods. Although there are gods and exploration of different religions belief in god(s) is not required.

This is a short article explaining the acceptance of LGBT people or in other words everyone is free to be who they want, no judging of people takes place. I love it as my faith... this is the main site, enjoy!!!

^_^

Janelle

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Guest harvester52

I attend a UU church, and it is definitely my spiritual home!

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Guest sarah f

I go to a United Methodist church and they don't discriminate there either. We have a at least two couples I know about that are gay. We don't judge, only accept everyone for who they really are.

Sarah F

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Guest Donna Jean

If I were to decide on a need for a church..this is certainly the route that I'd take....

And I really like this part.....

The inherent worth and dignity of every person;

I would of thought ALL churches have this belief...but, not so.......

Donna Jean

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Guest Soph

Well, I'm an atheist and generally an anti-religionist...

But the reason for the latter is because religion generally promotes hate and nonacceptance while preaching that their god loves everyone equally.

However, Unitarian Universalism is one religion that I think I can follow. None of the tenets strike any discord in me :P

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Guest supervixenxxx

Happy Vernal Equinox Everyone!

I found my way to UU and discovered that I really don't feel comfortable in my particular church. I've been full time for about six years and am confident, fearless and don't usually give a hoot in heck what people think of me. Except at that church... I don't know what it is, too many chiefs and not enough indians (sorry) kind of thing I guess. I'm as active as I've ever been in a church volunteering 4+ hours a week as a 3rd grade teacher's asst/tutor. But I just can't stand to deal with some of the people, especially one at church. Honestly, it has become the most frustrating experience there. The last time I attended the Sunday Program, I left shaking I was so upset and haven't been back since. Everyone there has only the best of intentions, of course and who could argue with the Seven Principals? I so dig that individuals from so many traditions and faiths and viewpoints can find common ground; UU is irresistible and should be a perfect fit. It sure as heck however does not include an 8th principle which says (evidently) something along the lines of "We hereby resolve to treat every new member as broken and needs to be fixed if they appear to be different", nor a ninth that says "Anyone who doesn't want to share every single gruesome detail of their lives needs to have a microscope placed in their posterior and make them uncomfortable and stop attending services." Nor a tenth that says "Every new single woman that seeks membership should have all of their time and energy monopolized by a stalky lesbian who operates under a great deal of pretense; this will be the price the new member must pay in order to enjoy community and grace." I'm only being the tiniest bit facetious; seriously.

I'm a Catholic Wiccan and I'm absolutely certain of that. I also studied, on my own, Jungian psychology and that is how I've integrated my the spiritual/religious paths of my childhood and adulthood. It was so comforting to discover that those two paths are more parallel than divergent, not to mention empowering and very humbling. If I can reconcile them to my absolute satisfaction, why oh why can't I find satisfaction in my local church? I keep thinking if I start going to the UU in San Francisco, maybe I'll have some peace where I won't be such a novelty. I was mentioning to an old friend of mine recently that UU has gotten on my nerves far more than Catholicism ever did ( I attended Catholic school from 7-12 grade btw, and had a wonderful experience; I know that's strange, no one ever molested, beat, berated or in anyway made me feel bad or less than and theology was my favorite subject and I loved going to mass), and that perhaps I'm meant to keep searching, or maybe I'm a heretical catholic.

Well, I'm glad I got that off my chest.

Best wishes and blessed be to all,

Jen

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Guest mzmanda

yay for UU!! I am a member of a UU congregation and I can honestly say the minister has been wonderful with connecting us to resources for my partners transition(MTF)..She is wonderful and I couldn't have asked for better people to be in my life!

Our congregation is truly welcoming to every person who walks in the door and I am very proud to call myself a member :)

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Guest Chrysee

I will say that having declared years ago to never align myself with another church, this does give me pause. Which does not mean that I'll take action (and I would not do such a thing unless my partner was beside me!) However, it is a bit compelling.

Thanks for sharing,

Cissy

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Guest Elizabeth K

Another Catholic 'Wiccan' here. I found the UU here in New Orleans through a friend of Donna Jean's, coincidentally also a Wicca Practitioner (I am really CRAFT, and Wicca comes the closest to that).

The UU is accepting - and I was surprised to see so much intelligence in approaching the subject of being spiritual (which I am, spiritual I mean).

But they warned me early - no one in the UU church agrees with anyone else in the UU church - grin! That sold me of being in fellowship with a buncha other free-spirited people who look at trying to live an 'ethics based life!'

Updates as I work through all this. We start membership classes May 31.

Lizzy

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Guest Donna Jean

.

I am personally enjoying the UUCC....

And if you knew me, you'd know that is not something I'd ever be likely to say.....

We'll see where it goes, but for now, it has me intrigued!

Huggs

Donna Jean

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Guest Lioness

I used to attend a UU church before being called to Quakerism (which is, on the whole, very similar except that UUs have better materials for teaching young people about sex :P), and I always enjoyed it there. Several of my good friends attend UU churches and I still enjoy tagging along occasionally. I think that Unitarian Universalism is the best place to go if you're recovering from rough experiences with another religious (or pseudo-religious) organization :P.

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Guest harvester52

I was a member of a UU church when I lived in Portland. It was fantastic. I sang in the choir, and ran sound for services. I still keep contact with the friends I made there, and I plan to return after I'm done with college. I'm Gnostic, which is essentially esoteric catholicism. My views were accepted there with open arms, as was my trans-ness. I made a lot of good friends.

- BC

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Guest Chrysee

I was a member of a UU church when I lived in Portland. It was fantastic. I sang in the choir, and ran sound for services. I still keep contact with the friends I made there, and I plan to return after I'm done with college. I'm Gnostic, which is essentially esoteric catholicism. My views were accepted there with open arms, as was my trans-ness. I made a lot of good friends.

- BC

You were a Portlander not that long ago, yes? I believe you mentioned that you're health care system was paying for your transition? Words to that effect, anyway.

At any rate, good bye. :(

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Sally

I attend a UU church when I am not attending the church of the almighty dollar at the store where I work.

I find them to be very open minded and very accepting - refreshing.

Love ya,

Sally

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Guest Kael147

I've hit reply to this topic three times already and I keep deleting what I want to say. Part of me wants to reply to the comment about the 8th, 9th, and 10th principles mentioned, but I think it is fair to say that was an experience rather than what it is like to be a UU.

I've been attending UU congregations for the past 15 years. Like any group of people in any organization, there are things and people I love and those that I don't. 

I took a sabattical of sorts from the UU church I belong to so that I could do some soul searching and find if it was really right for me. I learned that I am not a perfect UU and neither is anyone else. I think this is what is called the human condition!

One piece of my faith that I have been trying to work on is forgiveness for the shortcomings of others and trying to come from a place of love and compassion rather than judgment and intolerance. In some ways it is harder to be a UU than a Catholic (I was brought up Catholic) or perhaps any other religion that has a more rigid doctrine because you are told what to believe and how to live. In Catholisim there is also a mechanism for forgiveness when we fall short of these rules. We don't have that in the UU tradition.

This is where I struggle. I've had to remind myself that I am a party to the inherit worth and dignity of every person and that my compassion and love should equal forgiveness for others as well as myself for any of our shortcomings.

I'm rambling a little, but I feel very strongly about my exploration of my spiritual journey and I am ever grateful to have found the UU faith community. I am just starting my transition from ftm and I need to build community in safe places and I know I need my fellow UUs.  I feel the arms of the entire congregation wrapped around me every Sunday.

Through the wisdom of my community and my willingness to accept the diversity of life I am beginning to heal my wounds and become more whole.

I hope this makes sense and isn't riddled with too many spelling mistakes, I'm on my iPhone and cannot see my post past the small window.

Peace and harmony to all.

Love Kael

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Guest Kael147

Hey Everyone,

I know this isn't a well used forum, but I just wanted to post about OWL (our whole lives) this is an age appropriate sexuality program that UU churches offer. My kids are currently going through the programs at our congregation and one of the topics is gender and sexuality. It is so good for the kids to hear it taught and normalized in our faith community.

I have always thought it was a great program because it helps kids think about human sexuality in age appropriate ways and offers a forum for them to ask questions, but it is so much more to me now. I just wanted to give it a shout out!

It really is a great community.

Kael

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JenniferB

I am interested in UU after visiting their website and their beliefs. I am thinking seriously of attending service next Sunday.

The church I would prefer to go to made it obvious last summer they would not accept me for who I am and wanted me to detrainsition; and offered therapy to do so. Yeah right. :rolleyes:

What I like about this church is that they are actively involved in the community and are totally inclusive. Also I can still go to the Buddhist Temple without them trying to make me feel that what I'm doing is wrong. What I believe should not be dictated by someone else. That needs to be my own journey. I also want to become more socially active and be a part of like minded people.

As with anything else I'm going to be nervous the first time I go. But I won't let that stop me.

Jenny

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Guest Elizabeth K

Dee Jay, Sally and I are all UU. We LOVE it - mainly because (1) their idea of rational thought in approaching spiritually (2) The promotion of ETHICAL LIVING in everything!

I am also a follower of earth-based spirituality. I was Catholic, until I joined the UU. All that is openly accepted.

And finally, our gender dysphoria and subsequent transitioning, is of interest to them. but no big deal.

You will LOVE the Uniterian Universalist people.

Lizzie

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Guest Kael147

Hey Jennifer,

If the congregation you go to is anything like mine, someone will introduce themselves to you right away. If not make sure you introduce yourself to a couple people or try to say hello to the minister. You may even call ahead and say you plan to attend and would like to say hello.

I know my congregation fall all over themselves to make you feel welcome when a new transgender person comes in.

Go a few times before making any decisions about the church, the services vary from week to week and some will hit home more than others. I wish you all the best and hope you find a home with UUs!

Kael

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Guest Tasi

The UU church changed me back. I was raised Presbytarian, but went to Methodist and Baptist churches on occasion when growing up. I grew away from church after college and after divorce. My current wife is not religious. When I decided to more fully explore my trans feelings, I ended up starting a TG group in the Roanoke/Blacksburg VA area and we ended up holding our meetings at the UU church in Blacksburg and the MCC church in Roanoke. The pastor and the congregation at the UU church were wonderful and fully accepting of diversity and I felt that I had finally found a church home that would allow me to embrace my own brand of spirituality. And as Lizzie said, you will love the UU people. It's wonderful to be able to practice your beliefs in a warm and welcoming environment. treasure it when you have it. Hugs....Tasi

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Guest Donna Jean

If I were to decide on a need for a church..this is certainly the route that I'd take....

And I really like this part.....

The inherent worth and dignity of every person;

I would of thought ALL churches have this belief...but, not so.......

Donna Jean

This is my post on the UU church from over two years ago.....

We've been members now for over a year and a half and I wonder why I never went before!

Huggs

Dee Jay

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Guest Mittens_kittens

Add me to the list of happy UU members. I actually have that quote on my one and only bumper sticker, Dee Jay.

I became a UU shortly after finding out that my oldest son was gay and didn't believe in a god. It was an eye-opening time for me and forced me to seriously examine my beliefs. I found that I could no longer embrace the condemning beliefs of the fundamental church that I was attending at the time. I found a welcome, non-judgmental home with the Unitarian Universalists, where I was encouraged in finding my own personal path of spirituality.

It was a reaffirmation that I was in the right place for me and my family when I learned my youngest was TG. I never had a fear that they wouldn't continue to love and support him and me when we shared with them a few months ago. In fact, they went out of their way to create a beautiful ceremony where they applauded his courage to transition, stated their promise to stand beside him through the process, welcomed and embraced his new name and said a loving goodbye to the old one.

I would encourage anyone who is searching for a warm, compassionate community to check them out!

Mittens

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Guest Elizabeth K

I LOVE my UU Church!

It keeps getting better and better.

Lizzy

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JenniferB

I went to the UU church today, and enjoyed it. Got to talk with the minister and a bunch of other people. The fact that they don't have any requirements on what people believe was a big deciding point on why I attended this service. I enjoy the singing of hymns and could feel the spirituality there. I intend to attend next week's service. They also have a meeting every other Saturday for people who are recovering addictions. 6 months sobriety required (I have 9 months). My life is becoming so full now. My time on the computer has dropped a lot, and that's a good thing..

Jenny

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StephanieVikingGirl

I had some good experiences working with a UU church a few years ago. I wasn't a member, but I was asked to co-write, and co-lead some pagan rituals on occasion. Nice people, a very friendly congregation in Maryland.

Stephanie

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