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Follow my passion or the money?


Mason26

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Hello. Not sure if I can post this here, seeing as it has little to do with being trans, but I've gotten such good advice in the past so I figured I'd try here.

I'm 22, living at home, and never had a real job before. This is due to a lot of reasons, the most prominent being the pandemic and some health issues I've had (doing better now, but I think the work I'd be able to do is still pretty limited). Now I'm in more of a position to start moving forward in my life, but I'm struggling to figure out what to do. My mom strongly thinks I should follow my passions because work can be, well, soul crushing. She actively encourages me to work on what I want regardless of whether I make much or any money, and she has no problem with me living at home.

I'm worried about doing this for two big reasons, however. One, I think my mom has a lot more faith in how much money I'd be able to make than I do. In this economy, I feel like I should be doing something that at least guarantees a paycheck, even if it's small. Two, I'm terrified that making my hobbies (or hobby, more like) a career will kill it. This has happened in the past with something I did since childhood, and I haven't had much interest in it for years. Or what if the passion just fizzles out naturally? This is something I care deeply about and I have for the past couple years, but anything's possible. I don't have enough things I care about to risk.

But I don't know if getting a conventional job will work for me, either. I don't have my license yet (working on that as fast as I can) and no degree. It's painful for me to stand for long periods of time and I get tired easily. There's also the issue of being pre-T and possibly being dead-named all day (though that could be a problem pursuing my passions as well). There's nothing I can really think of that interests me, though the idea of getting out of the house and socializing is a plus.

As for working from home, I haven't found anything that works, and in some ways it's the worst of both worlds. Not to mention my internet is BAD, haha.

I feel like there was some stuff I forgot to mention, but I can add that later. I guess I just feel lost. I don't even know what the end goal is here. It makes me feel sick thinking about it. Any advice is much appreciated.

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I was a government supervisor for Civil Service employees down here in CA.  It was a career I would never have intended to choose, but it caught me and was very fulfilling for the 33  years I worked in my last agency.  I don't know what the Civil Service system up there in your Province is like, but it might be a source to look at.  You do not say what your passions up there are, but it is a field that you might want to look into.  I am retired from the State, but I have a decent pension and am using the "prepaid time" I have now to do my passions in life.  (This site being one of them).   I would also check with a local LGBTQ center in your area because they often have "job finder links" of employers who will accept you into their legally protected work places that will be stable and welcoming. 

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There's different perspectives on it.  My husband sometimes says, "Turning a hobby into a job is a great way to ruin both."  He's followed the money, which is how he has multiple college degrees and is doing something entirely different than any of them are normally used for.  I would say, though, that his passion is actually PEOPLE.  That makes just about everything he does part of his true passion.   I'm thankful that he's looked for having a good income, because that means the rest of us don't have the financial pressures we might otherwise. 

 

I followed what I enjoy.  When I was able to do it, graphic art provided me with enough money that if I had been careful (and had the skills to do so) I might have been able to provide for myself.  But I lived with my parents until age 26, and with my GF after (and now with my forever family.)  Probably 75% or more of the money I made over the years sits in the bank.  Since I have a roof over my head, a nest to sleep in, and food on the table, I just don't buy much.  What I did in following my passion worked for me, but it might NOT work for others who have greater needs. 

 

My sister followed her passions too.  She really wanted to be a writer, and GF and I took care of her while she tried.  And tried.  And tried.  She won a few short story contests and made a bit of money here and there, but for her the idea of following her passion ended up NOT being an income.  She figured out it wasn't working and took a job as a secretary for a couple of years.  She's a deputy sheriff now.  Maybe someday she'll be recognized as a writer, or maybe not.  Sometimes you have to set aside a passion for something more realistic when things aren't working out. 

 

I'm not sure about the opportunities available where you live, but here a lot of people start out in factory work.  It can be tough, but it is a non-discriminatory environment with decent pay and good medical benefits.  Some people work for a couple of years after high school to save up for a debt-free college.  Some people are able to get training grants and scholarships through a factory's program, and then they can be higher level technicians or management when they get done.  And (while probably not good for trans folks), there's the military.  Not sure how it is in Canada, but in the USA military service makes you eligible for all sorts of programs that aren't just college-related.  My husband had a college degree, but had trouble getting work during the big recession over a decade ago.  He got ahead by a combination of factory work and a National Guard enlistment.  He was married to two of my partners at the time, and they tell me those years were kind of tense....so there's no reason to sugarcoat the fact that finding your way in the world in your early 20's is a difficult thing. 

 

I would say, start with a reasonable short term goal.  What do you need in the next 3 months?  Then a medium-term goal.  What do you need in the next 12 months?  Then think of where you might like to be in 5 years.  How do those goals match up?  What opportunities locally are there to make money?  Can you do something for an employer that can get you some free training and certifications?  When you are looking for opportunities, ask questions in interviews about what training, grants, or scholarships might be available if you perform well.  Make it clear that you're willing to work hard, but that you don't want to stay stagnant in one spot.  And if you feel up to it, take advantage of the fact that you're young and single.  You can do something crazy!  You could be a deck hand on a cargo ship sailing around the world.  Or a long-haul truck driver seeing something new every day.  Youth and singleness and ability to travel are their own commodities.  You can do things that older people with connections and responsibilities can't because they are tied down.  Part of your searching for opportunities should be in the "crazy" department, if only just because you can.  🙂

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49 minutes ago, VickySGV said:

I was a government supervisor for Civil Service employees down here in CA.  It was a career I would never have intended to choose, but it caught me and was very fulfilling for the 33  years I worked in my last agency.  I don't know what the Civil Service system up there in your Province is like, but it might be a source to look at.  You do not say what your passions up there are, but it is a field that you might want to look into.  I am retired from the State, but I have a decent pension and am using the "prepaid time" I have now to do my passions in life.  (This site being one of them).   I would also check with a local LGBTQ center in your area because they often have "job finder links" of employers who will accept you into their legally protected work places that will be stable and welcoming. 

I've never given government work much thought, I guess because there's a lot I dislike about my government. I'm sure you've felt the same way. But there's a lot of good things you can do from that type of position. I don't have a degree and I'm not in a position where I think college/university would be the best idea, so that makes a lot of those jobs out of the question. I do want to help people though, I wonder if there's anything I could do that doesn't require a degree. I mean, of course there is, I just have to find it. I appreciate the suggestion, though. Seeing as civil service is something I've never really considered, it's a good reminder that there are many, MANY careers I haven't considered.

Good point on checking out LGBTQ centers. That could be complicated seeing as I'm not really out, but I'll definitely look into it.

As for what my passions are, I don't really want to say too much out of fear of being identified (I highly doubt anyone I know uses this website, but I'm paranoid, haha) but it's in the creative field. Hence my fear of not earning enough and/or losing the spark. I might be looking at things a bit too narrowly though. Thank you very much for your answer.

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4 minutes ago, Mason26 said:

As for what my passions are, I don't really want to say too much out of fear of being identified (I highly doubt anyone I know uses this website, but I'm paranoid, haha) but it's in the creative field. Hence my fear of not earning enough and/or losing the spark.

 

I definitely understand this part.  I haven't been too specific on this forum about my art work, because some of it (especially some of the video game character concept stuff) might identify me.  Never know who's reading, and I share enough about my family life that somebody might be able to but 2 and 2 together.  Its not exactly paranoia when they really ARE out to get you 🤣

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10 minutes ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

There's different perspectives on it.  My husband sometimes says, "Turning a hobby into a job is a great way to ruin both."  He's followed the money, which is how he has multiple college degrees and is doing something entirely different than any of them are normally used for.  I would say, though, that his passion is actually PEOPLE.  That makes just about everything he does part of his true passion.   I'm thankful that he's looked for having a good income, because that means the rest of us don't have the financial pressures we might otherwise. 

First off, just want to say thank you for the detailed reply! I have heard the same things your husband said, and it's been somewhat true for me. A hobby I had in the past I fully intended on being my career, and that drove me to complete a large project. But once I was done, learning about the business/technical side of things I think was part of that hobby's downfall (not the only part, a lot of stuff was happening at that time). Now I still get ideas for projects, but when it comes to actually doing it I feel almost disgusted by it. That's great that your husband has a passion that can apply to just about anything, haha. I love helping and just talking to people too, but I'm not sure if that's strong enough to draw me to any career.

10 minutes ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

I followed what I enjoy.  When I was able to do it, graphic art provided me with enough money that if I had been careful (and had the skills to do so) I might have been able to provide for myself.  But I lived with my parents until age 26, and with my GF after (and now with my forever family.)  Probably 75% or more of the money I made over the years sits in the bank.  Since I have a roof over my head, a nest to sleep in, and food on the table, I just don't buy much.  What I did in following my passion worked for me, but it might NOT work for others who have greater needs. 

tThat's good that graphic art worked for you. I've heard it can be tough to get into, but obviously people do get into it.

10 minutes ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

My sister followed her passions too.  She really wanted to be a writer, and GF and I took care of her while she tried.  And tried.  And tried.  She won a few short story contests and made a bit of money here and there, but for her the idea of following her passion ended up NOT being an income.  She figured out it wasn't working and took a job as a secretary for a couple of years.  She's a deputy sheriff now.  Maybe someday she'll be recognized as a writer, or maybe not.  Sometimes you have to set aside a passion for something more realistic when things aren't working out. 

Hehe, writing was the ruined passion I was talking about earlier. I admire your sister's perseverance, even if it never did end up working out for her. I hope she at least still enjoys writing as a hobby. Stories like this are part of the reason I've never gotten back into writing. If I don't have much interest, and there's not much money, what's the point? I hope I can enjoy it as a hobby again someday.

10 minutes ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

I'm not sure about the opportunities available where you live, but here a lot of people start out in factory work.  It can be tough, but it is a non-discriminatory environment with decent pay and good medical benefits.  Some people work for a couple of years after high school to save up for a debt-free college.  Some people are able to get training grants and scholarships through a factory's program, and then they can be higher level technicians or management when they get done.  And (while probably not good for trans folks), there's the military.  Not sure how it is in Canada, but in the USA military service makes you eligible for all sorts of programs that aren't just college-related.  My husband had a college degree, but had trouble getting work during the big recession over a decade ago.  He got ahead by a combination of factory work and a National Guard enlistment.  He was married to two of my partners at the time, and they tell me those years were kind of tense....so there's no reason to sugarcoat the fact that finding your way in the world in your early 20's is a difficult thing. 

I'm not sure I have the health for factory work, but I do like the idea of doing something more hands on. And I'm not a military person at all. I do appreciate the suggestions, though. And you're right, it's tough for people my age right now. It always has been, to an extent.

10 minutes ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

I would say, start with a reasonable short term goal.  What do you need in the next 3 months?  Then a medium-term goal.  What do you need in the next 12 months?  Then think of where you might like to be in 5 years.  How do those goals match up?  What opportunities locally are there to make money?  Can you do something for an employer that can get you some free training and certifications?  When you are looking for opportunities, ask questions in interviews about what training, grants, or scholarships might be available if you perform well.  Make it clear that you're willing to work hard, but that you don't want to stay stagnant in one spot.  And if you feel up to it, take advantage of the fact that you're young and single.  You can do something crazy!  You could be a deck hand on a cargo ship sailing around the world.  Or a long-haul truck driver seeing something new every day.  Youth and singleness and ability to travel are their own commodities.  You can do things that older people with connections and responsibilities can't because they are tied down.  Part of your searching for opportunities should be in the "crazy" department, if only just because you can.  🙂

This is very helpful. I need to seriously think about everything you wrote. Thank you very much. I haven't really thought much about how this is supposed to be a fun, exciting time. I hope I can feel that way about it someday.

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13 minutes ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

I definitely understand this part.  I haven't been too specific on this forum about my art work, because some of it (especially some of the video game character concept stuff) might identify me.  Never know who's reading, and I share enough about my family life that somebody might be able to but 2 and 2 together.  Its not exactly paranoia when they really ARE out to get you 🤣

Haha, you're exactly right! And unfortunately, they are out to get the people who use sites like this one.

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2 hours ago, Mason26 said:

I don't have a degree and I'm not in a position where I think college/university would be the best idea, so that makes a lot of those jobs out of the question.

 

That is NOT true, while I supervised one unit that was professional level people in it, I also was co-supervisor on another two units that were skilled artisans and technicians that did not require degrees, but rated you on proven skills from other sources.  There are public affairs art studios for most agencies, and there are public contact technicians that the agency trains on the job.  You are hired on your willingness to learn what they want done. 

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1 hour ago, Mason26 said:

That's good that graphic art worked for you. I've heard it can be tough to get into, but obviously people do get into it.

 

Hehe, writing was the ruined passion I was talking about earlier. I admire your sister's perseverance, even if it never did end up working out for her. I hope she at least still enjoys writing as a hobby. Stories like this are part of the reason I've never gotten back into writing. If I don't have much interest, and there's not much money, what's the point? I hope I can enjoy it as a hobby again someday.

 

I'm not sure I have the health for factory work, but I do like the idea of doing something more hands on.

 

Graphic art is tough to get into, and tough to stay in.  Unfortunately for me, I have TBI from an assault last year and it negatively impacted my ability to do the work I was into.  Fine motor skills are essential, and I have trouble staring at a computer for the hours at a time it takes.  Even if I got better, once you're out of the game for a little while you will have trouble getting contracts again.  Writing might be similar.... the trouble is always trying to find people who want to publish what you've got.  Some people are able to self-publish to get started, but that's a big investment.  Print up a thousand copies of what you wrote, and who knows if sales will get started?  My sister tried to get a couple of publishers to look at her work, and nobody was interested.  It also didn't help that we're in flyover country.  They don't take you seriously as a writer if you're not from New York or LA, it seems.  IDK what it is like in Canada, but I suspect if you really wanted to write for a living you'd want to be in an area where you can easily meet with people in the industry. 

 

I'm not sure how Canada is with labor law, but in the USA they must provide reasonable accommodations so you can do the job.  For example, if standing on a production line is hard and the job can be done while sitting on a stool, the employer is required to provide that.  If a person in a wheelchair applies for the job and they can do it while seated, the employer is required to provide a pedestal for the wheelchair so they can work at the appropriate height.  There's supposed to be no discrimination against those who have physical limitations.  Realistically, of course, there is some of that....but if you've got a couple of health issues that shouldn't keep you away from applying for a factory job.  And, if it doesn't work out, you can always do something else.  Nothing wrong with trying something for a couple of weeks and then deciding it isn't for you. 

 

 

 

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I used to work for the social security department here and we received training in employment issues, even though they had

private Employment service contractors. The first step in getting stable employment is to do something - explaining gaps in your employment history (or no history at all) is important. It was drilled into us that volunteer work, education as well as employment in a field you don't particularly want to stay in increase your chances of starting the journey to your life's work.

 

Over here we have training providers who can help you find apprenticeships or traineeships in a variety of fields. My daughter

started a traineeship in Business administration for 12 months and was offered full time work at the end of the time. She now earns great money as a corporate secretary manager. My son started an unpaid PR internship at a large food festival and again ended up as a full-time employee and now works for a very large non-for-profit organization here. I don't know what you have over there?

 

I also knew an artist who worked as a graphic designer for a cancer council 3 days a week to fund his artistic career. 

He seemed to think the balance stopped him "ruining" his true artistic calling.

 

Hugs

 

MaybeRob

 

 

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A lot of people do work on their passion but also work a "day job" to pay the bills.  

I also write as an amateur just because I like to, really I have to in a way.  I have for years.  I realize that I'll never make any money from it but meh.  I do it for me.

I started working for local government (city public works) to pay the bills.  I stayed with them for over 30yrs, and retired with an actual pension.  And I was still able to do my writing on the side.  Surprisingly, I actually did get some satisfaction from my job.  It was something that had to be done, and actually helped the community.

 

As for the writing?  I still do it.  I'm not dead yet.  Maybe something will someday get published.  If not, I still had the satisfaction of doing it.

 

It is hard to make a living as an artist, or in about any creative field.  I have one daughter that does it as a graphic designer as her profession.  She also works on her personal art because she wants to.  The "starving artist" trope is a thing.

 

I guess my point is there's nothing wrong with working a "day job" to enable you to pursue your passion.

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1 hour ago, VickySGV said:

 

That is NOT true, while I supervised one unit that was professional level people in it, I also was co-supervisor on another two units that were skilled artisans and technicians that did not require degrees, but rated you on proven skills from other sources.  There are public affairs art studios for most agencies, and there are public contact technicians that the agency trains on the job.  You are hired on your willingness to learn what they want done. 

That's very interesting. I guess a good step to take right now would be to get any experience I can and be willing to learn. I can pick stuff up pretty fast, so I think that'll be useful.

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1 hour ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

Graphic art is tough to get into, and tough to stay in.  Unfortunately for me, I have TBI from an assault last year and it negatively impacted my ability to do the work I was into.  Fine motor skills are essential, and I have trouble staring at a computer for the hours at a time it takes.  Even if I got better, once you're out of the game for a little while you will have trouble getting contracts again.  Writing might be similar.... the trouble is always trying to find people who want to publish what you've got.  Some people are able to self-publish to get started, but that's a big investment.  Print up a thousand copies of what you wrote, and who knows if sales will get started?  My sister tried to get a couple of publishers to look at her work, and nobody was interested.  It also didn't help that we're in flyover country.  They don't take you seriously as a writer if you're not from New York or LA, it seems.  IDK what it is like in Canada, but I suspect if you really wanted to write for a living you'd want to be in an area where you can easily meet with people in the industry. 

I'm very sorry to hear about what happened to you. I'm sorry if this sounds hollow, but I really hope you're doing alright now.

 

I always thought I'd self publish because of how hard it is to get published. Learning about the business side really bothered me. I have no interest in any of it. I imagine getting published would be easier in say Vancouver, but I live in a place that's not exactly known for its authors. Writing is something I doubt I'll ever earn money from, the reason I want to get back into it is solely for me.

1 hour ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

I'm not sure how Canada is with labor law, but in the USA they must provide reasonable accommodations so you can do the job.  For example, if standing on a production line is hard and the job can be done while sitting on a stool, the employer is required to provide that.  If a person in a wheelchair applies for the job and they can do it while seated, the employer is required to provide a pedestal for the wheelchair so they can work at the appropriate height.  There's supposed to be no discrimination against those who have physical limitations.  Realistically, of course, there is some of that....but if you've got a couple of health issues that shouldn't keep you away from applying for a factory job.  And, if it doesn't work out, you can always do something else.  Nothing wrong with trying something for a couple of weeks and then deciding it isn't for you. 

 

 

 

Canada has laws like this too. I guess I feel like they would discriminate anyways because it's very, VERY rare that you see say a cashier sitting. Often the job description REQUIRES that you have to stand for long periods of time. It's ridiculous because it actually makes your job harder to do so that you can... look presentable? I don't know. But I guess I'll never know how it'll turn out unless I go for it.

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56 minutes ago, MaybeRob said:

I used to work for the social security department here and we received training in employment issues, even though they had

private Employment service contractors. The first step in getting stable employment is to do something - explaining gaps in your employment history (or no history at all) is important. It was drilled into us that volunteer work, education as well as employment in a field you don't particularly want to stay in increase your chances of starting the journey to your life's work.

 

Over here we have training providers who can help you find apprenticeships or traineeships in a variety of fields. My daughter

started a traineeship in Business administration for 12 months and was offered full time work at the end of the time. She now earns great money as a corporate secretary manager. My son started an unpaid PR internship at a large food festival and again ended up as a full-time employee and now works for a very large non-for-profit organization here. I don't know what you have over there?

 

I also knew an artist who worked as a graphic designer for a cancer council 3 days a week to fund his artistic career. 

He seemed to think the balance stopped him "ruining" his true artistic calling.

 

Hugs

 

MaybeRob

 

 

Thanks for sharing these stories. I have some independent contracting work under my belt at least, so that should help. And balance is always important.

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57 minutes ago, Ivy said:

A lot of people do work on their passion but also work a "day job" to pay the bills.  

I also write as an amateur just because I like to, really I have to in a way.  I have for years.  I realize that I'll never make any money from it but meh.  I do it for me.

I started working for local government (city public works) to pay the bills.  I stayed with them for over 30yrs, and retired with an actual pension.  And I was still able to do my writing on the side.  Surprisingly, I actually did get some satisfaction from my job.  It was something that had to be done, and actually helped the community.

 

As for the writing?  I still do it.  I'm not dead yet.  Maybe something will someday get published.  If not, I still had the satisfaction of doing it.

 

It is hard to make a living as an artist, or in about any creative field.  I have one daughter that does it as a graphic designer as her profession.  She also works on her personal art because she wants to.  The "starving artist" trope is a thing.

 

I guess my point is there's nothing wrong with working a "day job" to enable you to pursue your passion.

That's the interesting thing about my situation. I don't have to pay the bills, I'm being encouraged to work on my passion. What I'm trying to figure out is whether or not it's a good idea to try to make my hobby a living. You'd think making money from it would make it more rewarding, but I'm not sure. I might find it more satisfying to work a different job and keep it as a hobby, as you did. Or maybe I can find a way to make it work as a career. Thanks for your reply.

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58 minutes ago, Mason26 said:

I'm very sorry to hear about what happened to you. I'm sorry if this sounds hollow, but I really hope you're doing alright now.

 

Canada has laws like this too. I guess I feel like they would discriminate anyways because it's very, VERY rare that you see say a cashier sitting. Often the job description REQUIRES that you have to stand for long periods of time. It's ridiculous because it actually makes your job harder to do so that you can... look presentable? I don't know. But I guess I'll never know how it'll turn out unless I go for it.

 

Well, I'm not 100% alright.  Maybe I never will be.  But when things happen in life, you learn to pivot from what you're doing now to something else that works.  I've focused my efforts this year on growing food in the garden for my family, and doing a lot in the kitchen.  The crazy thing is that when I run the numbers (comparing what I've grown to prices in the store), I create more value for my family with what I do now than with what I did before.  Life comes in phases, and if perhaps my commercial artwork phase of life is over temporarily or over permanently, I guess I'm OK.  I think you'll find some truth like that for yourself as you tackle your employment uncertainties. 

 

I suppose there can be a difference between the letter of the law and how things end up being in actual situations.  That's where you're going to have to advocate for yourself, because nobody is probably going to do it for you.  Probably approach a job description and say something like, "I see this requirement and I will do my best, however I have an issue with my knee and I will need accommodation for that."  It helps to use the exact language from the law....both for accuracy, and to let them know that you know what you're doing.  Try it, and see what they say.  If legal, you might attempt to record what they say.  If not permitted, you might request any rejections in writing.  If you get screwed out of a job for a poor reason, you might be able to sue and win.  IDK about Canada, but here in the USA you can find "no fees unless you win" attorneys, and judgements in your favor can include a company paying your legal costs. 

 

 

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11 hours ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

Well, I'm not 100% alright.  Maybe I never will be.  But when things happen in life, you learn to pivot from what you're doing now to something else that works.  I've focused my efforts this year on growing food in the garden for my family, and doing a lot in the kitchen.  The crazy thing is that when I run the numbers (comparing what I've grown to prices in the store), I create more value for my family with what I do now than with what I did before.  Life comes in phases, and if perhaps my commercial artwork phase of life is over temporarily or over permanently, I guess I'm OK.  I think you'll find some truth like that for yourself as you tackle your employment uncertainties. 

It must be awful losing something you loved that way. It makes me angry. It's good that you did find other things you love and that fulfill you, even if you shouldn't have had to. As you said, sometimes bad things just happen, and things don't go how you expected. I think a big part of our lives is devoted to dealing with that.

11 hours ago, awkward-yet-sweet said:

 

I suppose there can be a difference between the letter of the law and how things end up being in actual situations.  That's where you're going to have to advocate for yourself, because nobody is probably going to do it for you.  Probably approach a job description and say something like, "I see this requirement and I will do my best, however I have an issue with my knee and I will need accommodation for that."  It helps to use the exact language from the law....both for accuracy, and to let them know that you know what you're doing.  Try it, and see what they say.  If legal, you might attempt to record what they say.  If not permitted, you might request any rejections in writing.  If you get screwed out of a job for a poor reason, you might be able to sue and win.  IDK about Canada, but here in the USA you can find "no fees unless you win" attorneys, and judgements in your favor can include a company paying your legal costs. 

 

 

Good point. I assume getting a doctor's note would be very helpful, too. I'm not sure if there are attorneys like that here, but if they have them in the states, I don't see why not. I wonder though if you can know why you were turned down for the job? It could be because they didn't want to accomodate me.It could be because of my... ahem... irregular gender presentation. It could just be because I wasn't right for the job.

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The best work is work you are passionate about.  I never thought I'd be coding data to collect Personal Information about people.  Background checking is vital for a healthy workforce though and in this job I can influence the security of that data and how its collected.

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On 9/20/2023 at 12:42 AM, gemmalouise said:

The best work is work you are passionate about.  I never thought I'd be coding data to collect Personal Information about people.  Background checking is vital for a healthy workforce though and in this job I can influence the security of that data and how its collected.

Thanks for your response. I guess sometimes what we're passionate about can be a big surprise.

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